Dr harold Gunatillake

Your Prostate Gland- how much trouble can it give you?-

by Harold Gunatillake

Dr. Harold Gunethilake

 

 

 

 

www.Doctorharold.com

Transcript:

Your prostate gland is about the size of an areconut seed or walnut seed situated at the bottom of your bladder in front of your back passage. The urine outlet from the bladder called the urethra runs through it.

The main function of the gland is to secrete fluid along that nourishes and protects sperm, manufactured in your testicles.

In most people the gland gives no problems, but in some it can get inflamed, like any other gland in your body. This, inflammation caused by bacteria is referred to as acute prostatitis.

As you age the prostate naturally gets bigger and in most people such enlargement gives no problems.  It is referred to as ‘Benign Prostatic hypertrophy.




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Health & Views – August 3nd Issue – by Harold Gunatillake

Dr. Harold Gunethilake




Download the PDF file .

 

Disclaimer:

The information contained in this article is for general information purposes only, and whilst the author will endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, eLanka makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the eLanka website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained in this article for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In otherwords, eLanka In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of this website / article. Also please note that through this website / web page articles you are able to link to other websites which are not under the control of eLanka and therefore we have no control over the nature, content and availability of those sites. The inclusion of any links does not necessarily imply a recommendation or endorse the views expressed within them




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Video on Resistant Starch and health benefits by Dr Harold Gunatillake

Dr. Harold Gunethilake

Resistant Starch and health benefits

Transcript:
Let us discuss today, the importance of knowing what resistant starch is and its benefits to humans.
Starch is an odorless, tasteless, soft white substance that is made by all green plants.
They are classified according to structure or source, as follows:
RS1 resists digestion because it is bound within the fibrous cell walls. Sources: whole or partially milled grains, legumes, and seeds.
RS2 resists digestion because of the granule’s nature, Sources: raw potatoes, some legumes, unripe bananas, and high amylose starches, such as high amylose corn
RS3 is a man-made and chemically modified starch found in a wide range of products.
By definition- Resistant starch is a type of starch that does not get digested in the digestive tract, it is resistant to digestion by the gut enzymes, and considered a type of dietary fiber.




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Discussing common health issues affecting us with age & sharing comments for better health & longevity-By Dr.Harold Gunatillake

 Harold Gunatillake

Pulse

Pulse-what you should know about?
Transcript:
Checking your pulse at your wrist at the base of your thumb regularly, will save many health issues related to your cardiovascular disease and other organs like your thyroid gland.
Pulse is generally checked at your wrist- called the Radial pulse: at the neck called the carotid pulse.
Checking your pulse at the wrist:
Check on the inside of your wrist, below your thumb.
Gently place two fingers of your other hand on this artery. Count the beats for 30 sec. and multiply by two.
You cannot feel your heart but checking on your radial pulse you could read your heart.
Roll the two fingers over the radial artery softly and gently.




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Calcium channel blockers – By Dr.Harold Gunatillake

 

Calcium channel blockers - By Dr.Harold Gunatillake

 

by Harold Gunatillake

 

Calcium channel blockers
By Dr.Harold Gunatillake FRCS, FIACS, FICS, AM (Sing), MBBS. – Health writer

 

Do you know what calcium channel blockers are?
Most of you may be on a calcium channel blocker, prescribed by your
family physician, without your knowledge, for High Blood Pressure (essential
hypertension).

They are also called calcium antagonists, given for the treatment of a variety of conditions, such as high blood pressure, migraine and Raynaud’s disease (peripheral arterial spasm).

Calcium is required by the heart muscles and other blood vessels for efficient contraction movement. So blocking such a mechanism or inhibiting transport of calcium into cells will lower the blood pressure and widen blood vessels by affecting the muscle cells in the arterial walls, especially those of the coronary arteries. These calcium antagonists also tend to slow the heart rate which is also beneficial in situations where not only the blood pressure but also the heart rate needs to be slowed down for efficient muscle contractions and prevent premature aging of the muscle cells of the heart. By such action, the blood pressure is lowered chest pain (angina) is relieved and also corrects irregular heartbeat.




Some calcium channel blockers are available in short-acting forms and other long-acting forms. The quick-acting ones act quickly and the effects last only a few hours, while the long-acting medications are slowly released to provide a longer-lasting effect.

Examples of calcium channel blocking medication available include:
• Amlodipine (Norvasc)
• Diltiazem (Cardizem)
• Felodipine (Plendil)
• Isradipine (DynaCirc SR)
• Nifedipine (Adalat CC)
• Nisoldipine (Sular)
• Verapamil ( Calan Verelan

These drugs are normally prescribed in combination with other antihypertensive drugs. These calcium channel blockers are beneficial to prevent or improve symptoms in a variety of conditions, including
• High blood pressure
• Chest pain due to angina
• Migraine headaches
• Brain aneurysm complications
• Irregular heart beats
• Circulatory conditions like Raynaud’s disease

Effect on kidneys
Studies suggest that calcium channel blockers do not worsen the progression of renal disease but may rather provide benefit when systemic blood pressure has been tightly normalized.

Side effects of these medications are:
• Constipation-(beware of verapamil). Increase your fiber content and
drink plenty of water)
• Headache-(due to widening of arteries)
• Rapid heart rate
• Rash
• Drowsiness
• Flushing- (due to widening and relaxing of arteries)
• Nausea
• Swelling of legs and feet (pitting edema due to water retention).




Serious side effects are rare, and it is not wise to stop calcium-channel blockers without speaking to your doctor.

Most people who take these medications have no side –effects, or only
minor ones.

These channel blockers should not be taken with grapefruit as they can reduce your liver’s ability to eliminate calcium channel blockers from your body, allowing the medications to build up in your body.

Rebound effect
Some people who suddenly stop taking a calcium-channel blocker have a ‘rebound’ flare up of angina. Therefore, it is best not to stop taking these drugs without first consulting a doctor.

Check your blood pressure weekly until it is stable. Early high blood pressure has no early signs or symptoms as the body gets accustomed to the slow rising of the blood pressure. Most heart attacks and stroke are preventable if your blood pressure is taken care of.

Hope this article will be useful.
Stay safe


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Health & Views – August 1st Issue – by Harold Gunatillake

Dr Harold




Download the PDF file .

Disclaimer:

The information contained in this article is for general information purposes only, and whilst the author will endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, eLanka makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the eLanka website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained in this article for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In otherwords, eLanka In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of this website / article. Also please note that through this website / web page articles you are able to link to other websites which are not under the control of eLanka and therefore we have no control over the nature, content and availability of those sites. The inclusion of any links does not necessarily imply a recommendation or endorse the views expressed within them




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Origins of the Tamil and Sinhala Races-by Dr.Harold Gunatillake

Dr Harold

Transcript:
Where did they come?
The Dravidian Tamils & Indo-Aryan Sri Lankans
The term Dravidian is used to refer to all the non-Aryan population in the peninsula of India.
According to experts, the Tamils arrived in India around 3000 B C. Dravidians are believed
to be of African origin.
Some researchers are of the view that some Ethiopians have remarkable physical
resemblances.
So, the belief is that the first people who arrived at India were NEGROIDS, from Africa, with
black skin and curly hair.
The Anthropologists also created a new racial group called the “Mediterranean race’ and
identified the Dravidians came from this race, as the Mediterranean’s origin is black Negroid.
Summarising- Ethiopians in antiquity ruled India, and they were names the Naga.
The Naga’s created Sanskrit writing and language.
Nagas ruled all of India, Sri Lanka, and Burma.
They were a warlike people used bow, arrow, and noose
The Tamil people also known as Tamilar, are Dravidian ethnic group who speak Tamil as
their mother tongue.




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Tummy bloating is discussed-By Dr Harold Gunatillake

Dr Harold

Written by Dr. Harold Gunatillake
FRCS, FIACS, FICS, AM (Sing), MB, BS, -Health writer Tummy bloating or distension is a quite common condition due to gas production in your gut, that needs no attention, unless it becomes more severe and permanent.

In such a situation, think of eating high fibre foods. Oats is ideal for breakfast. It’s eaten in the form of rolled oats, oatmeal, oat milk, and oat bran and oat flour. They have several essential nutrients, including high dietary fibre. 100 gram serving provides 389 cals Avoid foods baked or cooked with processed rice and wheat flour for breakfast
You need to get 35 grams of fibre per day, so choose plant foods like grapes, bell peppers, beans, whole grains and nuts. High fibre foods keep you out of constipation and heart healthy, too
You may have extra gas in your tummy and cause heartburn- annoying symptom before you start the day. Eat enough to plan a diet to keep your weight within the normal range to help to minimise these symptoms.
Home remedy for heartburn is to drink some cold milk straight from the fridge and munching some cucumber slices kept in the fridge may suffice.
Eat small meals and more often to avoid indigestion. Eat sufficient not to feel full, and enjoy the day comfortably and you’ll relate to people better.
Hydrate yourself by drinking water, juices, tea and other beverages with little added sugar. Sometimes you feel down when you are dehydrated and you may not suspect the cause. Hydrating yourself you revive like watering a dehydrated plant.
Walking may help to relieve indigestion and gaseous feelings. Think of doing a walk if you feel uncomfortable in your belly.




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The origin of the Sinhala race and landing of Prince Vijaya discussed – By Harold Gunatillake

Harold Gunethilake

the origin of Sinhala race




Transcript:
This video discusses the origin of ther Sinhala race.
Prince Vijaya (Sinhala: විජය කුමරු) was the traditional first Sinhalese king
of Sri Lanka, mentioned in the Pali chronicles, including Mahavamsa.
According to these chronicles, he is the first recorded King of Sri Lanka. His
reign is traditionally dated to 543–505 BCE. According to the legends, he and
several hundred of his followers came to Lanka after being expelled from an
Indian kingdom. In Lanka, they displaced the island’s original inhabitants
(Yakkhas), established a kingdom and became ancestors of the modern
Sinhalese people.

Disclaimer:

The information contained in this article is for general information purposes only, and whilst the author will endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, eLanka makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the eLanka website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained in this article for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In otherwords, eLanka In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of data or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of this website / article. Also please note that through this website / web page articles you are able to link to other websites which are not under the control of eLanka and therefore we have no control over the nature, content and availability of those sites. The inclusion of any links does not necessarily imply a recommendation or endorse the views expressed within them




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