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The Best is Yet to Come! – An Aussie Umpire on Sangakkara

Kumar Chokshanada Sangakkara

Men with disciplined minds, set their sights on far loftier goals than others given to average thinking. Such are the virtues that have made Kumar Chokshanada Sangakkara become what he now is.

Kumar Sangakkara has played many a fine inning in his time. They have spanned across every notable playing field and every nook and cranny worth knowing on the cricket map.   They have stretched across all types of the game – from Tests to ODIs, to the T20s.   In each of them, his performances have won him accolades from men of discernment.   Be it with bat or lip, he has made his mark. His opponents know only too well how fiendishly difficult it is to match him – be it at play or at his lip and intellect, either singly or in combination.

 Ahead of its time

But none of those innings will measure up to the one he is soon poised to play. At 41 years of age, he now stands as President-designate of the Marylebone Cricket Club, when its current President steps down in September.    The honour is so compelling, it would stagger many local cricket pundits who tend to bestir themselves only when the world outside has recognised our heroes first.   The fact that this most conservative, most prestigious and most exclusive Cricket Club of all, found it fit and proper to break with tradition and nominate Kumar Sangakkara as its President for 2019-2020, is suggestive that the MCC will not idly twiddle its toes when they see a good man coming.   This is particularly so, when he is so ideally well suited to serve their larger needs worldwide.   In picking their man, the MCC were unwilling to consider any trappings outside sheer merit, and in choosing Sangakkara to be their first non-British President in its 232 years of existence, the MCC has forged well ahead of its time.

 MCC’s challenge ahead

 Growing trends in world cricket have compelled a prudent MCC to look beyond its traditional British shores for its next President.   The old order is changing.   India’s growing dominance and MCC’s waning global influence could not have escaped attention.   Keen on shedding its rotund, bucolic image to a more lean and hungry one, the MCC perhaps figured, they have to reach out and influence the rest of the world if they were to continue safeguarding the custodianship of the Laws, the game’s traditions and most importantly, the Spirit of Cricket concept.   In an act that can only be termed as extremely farsighted, the MCC looked beyond its shores for its next leader and settled on a daring prospect. In selecting Kumar Sangakkara for this rare honour, the MCC has managed to grab itself a lot of useful attention, even before Sanga’s term began.

 The perfect foil

 None would argue that in Kumar Sangakkara, one sees the perfect foil to effect the transition of the MCC in this 21st. century from a very exclusively British private cricket club, to a more globally orientated entity, capable of reversing its thinning global influence.   Towards this end, Sangakkara’s nomination could be the first step and he fits the bill perfectly.   He is well spoken and articulate; well read and well informed.   He is blessed with a razor-sharp intellect and is never out of his depth in any conversation.   He is suavely cosmopolitan, delightfully well-mannered, modern yet old fashioned and universally respected.   In choosing him as the medium of transition from what was, to what will be, the MCC chose wisely, for, much like his batting, he will not let the side down.   In fact, it would be hard to find someone on whose shoulders the very British traditions and by-plays which surround the MCC, would sit more easily upon, than Kumar Sangakkara.

 But to say that Sangakkara is a mere vehicle of convenience towards achieving a challenging goal for the Marylebone Cricket Club is unkind. Given the challenges, he is probably the finest broom one could lay one’s hands on to sweep away the cobwebs at Lord’s, and usher in a new order. Assuredly, he will need to cement international friendships and generate goodwill reaching far beyond the cricket fields.   Because he was thought to be so thoroughly well equipped, capable and deserving; and because he can smell the winds of change more acutely than most, it is but fitting that he has now been tasked to navigate the MCC through hitherto uncharted waters.   He may be the first non-British national to ascend the Presidency, but he won’t be the last.

 Sanga’s secret

 Prophets often go without honour in their own country.   Genius fares no better.   The latter can be spurned by an insensitive populace, unable to recognize or grasp its depth.   Detractors may not know but genius involves a lot of hard work and gallons of perspiration.   It involves the infinite capacity for taking pains and calls for an uncommon singleness of purpose in whatever the pursuit.   These are attributes which normal men given to easy life wouldn’t know the first thing about. They call for a discipline made of the finest steel in men.  Sanga has them all.

 

The pursuit of perfection and the associated single-mindedness have been Sanga’s greatest allies.   They have been his most significant contributions towards his own successes. These are characteristics which largely contribute towards moulding one’s character.   The underlying theme is discipline.   Men with disciplined minds, set their sights on far loftier goals than others given to average thinking. Such are the virtues that have made Kumar Sangakkara become what he now is.

 The irony of it all

 Be it his spectacular bouts of oratory (from behind the stumps or from a podium), or his deeds with the bat, Sangakkara hasn’t received the attention he deserves even in his own country.   It has not been widely suggested that he is the best batsman this country has produced.   Older generations still croon over the mercurial brilliance of Sathasivam or Sargo’s Hammondesque power.   Younger ones prefer to remember the volatile brilliance of Jayasuriya or Dilshan, or the sublime artistry of Aravinda de Silva.   The ruthlessly clinical, cleanly executed, highly bankable efforts of Sangakkara, hardly get a mention.   These are the very qualities which have made him the most influential Sri Lankan batsman in the modern era, yet they have gone largely unnoticed.   Truth be spoken, Sangakkara has scored more runs more often in times of need, than anyone else batting for his country.   Often they have come while batting at first drop and mostly against a gleaming new ball.   Yet, few have taken note.

 Some startling reading

In a comparative study among cricket’s all time ‘greats’, Test averages are what separate men from the boys.   They tell us of a player’s consistency in the highest theatre of cricket, over the period of his active playing years. They tell us of the consistency of a player’s effectiveness over his opponent. Besides, statistics don’t lie.   They may not tell the whole story, but they do, to a great extent.   A comparative study of some of cricket’s most influential batsmen can make startling reading.

 Unlike others on the list, Sangakkara also kept wicket for part of his career while holding 182 catches in Tests and effecting 20 stumpings.  In 404 ODIs, he held 402 catches and effected 99 stumpings while scoring 14,234 runs at an average of 41.98.   Although comparisons can be odious, in whichever group one places him as a batsman, Sangakkara’s achievements cannot be dwarfed nor ignored.   It takes a lot of commitment and character to maintain a high standard over a long period of time and Sangakkara’s achievements speak louder than all the words one could muster.

 Uniquely influential

 But despite being unquestionably an all-rounder of international class, it is as a batsman that he will be best remembered.   Often having kept wicket, he would bat at No 3 – a position which is the exclusive preserve of only the resolute, the resilient, and the single minded. Being a position of awesome responsibility, it is the single-most authoritative position which directly influences the rest of the batting.   Successful first drop batsmen are those who have a profound knowledge of their own game and are blessed with a discipline and character, which enable them to play within their limitations.   That Sangakkara has never been known to shirk or step back from his responsibilities is where his greatness lies.   He could be facing the fury of the opposition from the second ball of a match, but it would be the broadest of bats on offer with hands, head, feet and body in perfect harmony and commendable symmetry.   Often he would get down to business right away, for dominance is always better when applied with minimum delay.   Before he gave up wicket-keeping, Sangakkara amply qualified as the finest Sri Lankan all-rounder of all time.   If that survey covered the international arena, he would again have come very close to the top.   His statistics are irrefutable, but its not the statistics alone that matter.   His ‘all-roundedness’ has made him such a uniquely influential personality in the game, little wonder the MCC didn’t fail to grab him.

 ‘Plum’ Warner – an MCC cornerstone and former Captain of England, once described the MCC as “a private club with a public function.”   A long time later, its global influence has receded and the necessity to regain its footing has been acutely felt by those charged with caring for the club’s well-being.   Modernity has also compelled the MCC to shed some aspects of its exclusivity.   First, it was the acceptance of women members into the fold and now, for the first time, a President from beyond the shores of England.   50 years ago, both would have been unthinkable!

 The Spirit of Cricket Lecture

 The winds of change were not lost on Sangakkara when he delivered his ‘Spirit of Cricket – Cowdrey Lecture’ at Lord’s in 2011.   It was the first time a non–Britisher and still an active cricketer, graced that rostrum.   That in itself was a groundbreaking honour for both Sangakkara and his country. He then delivered an outstanding oration which made the world croon at every word he uttered.   In the process he didn’t fail to make some stinging references to the Sri Lankan cricket administration, in a speech considered by some, as the most courageous in cricket history, for that very reason.   Given the suffocating political atmosphere which prevailed at the time, this was praise well earned.   But the speech unfailingly earned the wrath and derision of the then Sports Minister, who considerably lowered his own standing through an unwarranted burst of criticism that was out of place and out of taste.   Given the significance of his new appointment and the intended projections of influence the MCC may wish to exert globally, it is unlikely that Sangakkara will merely decorate the club with his presence and provide a colourless Presidential year in office.   It is more in keeping with his persona that he makes the MCC and the cricket world both, sit up and take notice.

 The ‘Call of Lanka’

 Much like Imran Khan, Sangakkara is not averse to telling truth to power. And much like Imran Khan, it is likely that this wise, well-read, articulate and urbane man, will not allow his considerable talents and unrelenting passion to wither after cricket.   A wider and more fulfilling public role beckons, and one hopes he will heed the call and give leadership to a new generation of men, willing to hear ‘The Call of Lanka’ better, and serve it with greater sincerity.

It’s a hunch, but a strong one. The best of Sangakkara is yet to come!

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Balanced Diet By Present Day Concept

balanced diet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A diet is all that we consume in a day. And a balanced diet is a diet that containsan adequate quantity of the nutrients that we require in a day. A balanced diet includes six main nutrients, i.e. Fats, Protein, Carbohydrates, Fibre, Vitamins,and Minerals. All these nutrients are present in the foods that we eat.
By present day definition a balanced diet should include prebiotics and probiotics for the nourishment of the gut microbiota- your internal friends that looks after yourhealth in all respects and aspects.

Let us first find out what the cave man ate to be strong, tall robust and fit to hunt for his food.

Man is what he eats, goes a famous German saying. So, let us find out what ourstone age people’s delicacies were. Did they have a balanced diet?

These old cavemen lived in caves several thousand years ago in the jungles hunting for their own food daily. They did not have the means to cultivate and grow fruits and vegetables, but lived solely on hunted animal flesh, mostly barbecued or held on
fire to burn.

These prehistoric friends ate meat raw, lightly burnt animal bones and many a hearth excavated by archaeologists testify to a rudimentary knowledge of firemaking and roasting meats From what we can gather from the faunal remains left over from his hearty meals,
Balangoda man was a carnivore to the core.

He loved to gorge on meats of all kinds and was sure a very meaty fellow as a result. Meats gave him the protein he needed
to make his day.

Sri Lankan veddah’s were different. They are aborigines or indigenous people of Sri Lanka. Many veddahs also farmed using chena cultivation and they did kill animals to eat. They never harmed young and pregnant animals.

The staple food, rice, was cultivated in extensive paddy field, while vegetables,greens, grains and cereals were cultivated in rain-fed lands called ‘Chenas’

Veddas are famously known for their rich meat, venison and the flesh of rabbit, turtle, tortoise, monitor lizards, wild boar.

They did have a very balanced diet composed of rice, cereals, nuts, vegetables andanimal flesh.

Meat eating cave man during the Palaeolithic life, did not know that he needs tofeed his inside friends- the gut microbes.

So, you can now explain why the cave man’s Palaeolithic life expectancy was 25

On the other hand, the aboriginal veddahs in Sri Lanka lived longer because of the
variety of food such as rice, vegetable curries, mallung, ambul thiyal, kolakenda,
they consumed daily.

In contrast to the paleolithic cave man, veddah’s had a life span of about 60 or more. They naturally fed their gut microbes with fibre and probiotics.

The Western pattern diet (WPD) or standard American diet (SAD) is a modern dietary pattern that is generally characterized by high intakes of red meat, processed meat, pre-packaged foods, butter, fried foods, high-fat dairy products,
eggs, refined grains, potatoes, corn (and high-fructose corn syrup) and high-sugar ..

It is not a well-balanced diet as it lacks fibre and probiotics and prebiotics not included for the nourishment and wellbeing of the microbiota

A low-carb diet is low in carbohydrates, primarily found in sugary foods, pasta and bread. Instead, you eat real foods including protein, natural fats and vegetables.

Studies show that low-carb diets result in weight loss and improved health markers.

These diets have been in common use for decades and are recommended by many doctors.
This low carb and high fat diet originated from the lifestyles of eskimos.

The Inuit, the native people many call “eskimos” have not eaten carbs in over35,000 years. Somehow, they have managed to thrive. Ever seen a plant growing in the Arctic circle? No? So, no carbs. By the way the word Eskimo means “meat eater.” You don’t say?

Their gut microbial diversity is different from those who eat a high carb, low fat diet.
They do not live beyond 65 years because they have no microbial protection.

Modern diet relates to ‘Junk food’ that simply means an empty calorie food. …Junk food is an informal term applied to some foods which are perceived to have little or no nutritional value, but which also have ingredients considered unhealthy when eaten regularly, or to those considered unhealthy to consume at all.

Any diet regime should promote a healthier gut microbiota

“Low Carb with high fat diet regimes may not be the best to keep your gut microbiota happy and friendly”

Recent studies have revealed that over 100 trillion of beneficial bacteria, viruses and fungi are found mainly in our gut. In addition to looking after your health, mood, metabolism, mental health, autoimmune diseases endocrine disorders, gut-health, providing vitamins, immune system, cancer, and in many other ways, the gut bacteria or microbes as we call them, seem to keep bad bacteria in check.

We need to look after these beneficial microbes for our good health, and how should we do it?

Studies have revealed that gut microbes or microbiome has enormous functional responsibility to the host and the diet plays a fundamental role in the shaping of the composition of gut microbiota.ui4

A new study published in the “British Medical Journal” investigated these requirements of keeping healthy balanced diet as the traditional balanced meal containing high unprocessed carbs, low fat, and a moderate amount of proteins, and not the low carb diet referred to as a ketogenic diet, with high fat intake recommended for weight reduction.

Long term following of such diets may be detrimental for the survival of good microbiota in the gut and most likely result in self-created chronic inflammatory diseases in your body and discouraged according to present day studies.

Keto diets and Atkin types, promoting low carbs and high fat intake to combat overweight problems, may not be the best dietetic regimes, to keep microbial ecology inprime form for our health.

Please take time to enjoy & share the video.

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Kirstine Harvie awarded the Highest Medal for Outstanding Public Service at the Queens Honour List – Message from the Deputy Director-General to Kirstine Harvie

Kirstine Harvie

Photos Source: Linked In

Dear Friends

I have been informed by Laurensz Manricks that the Daughter of Ken Harvie OAM

Former President of the Sri Lanka Society of Queensland and also the Convenor

of the Sri Lanka Radio 4EB  Kirstine Harvie has been awarded the Highest Medal

for Outstanding Public Service at the Queens Honour List.

We are very proud of Kirstine’s achievements and would like to take this opportunity to

Congratulate her and Wish her All the Very Best for the Future.

I have enclosed a Congratulation Letter from the Deputy Director General and please

be free to include this in your Community Newsletter.

We of course are very proud of individuals of Sri Lankan Heritage who receive accolades

and achieved the Highest Honours in their field of work.

Thanking you

Anton_Swan

director

Hi everyone,

I am pleased to announce that Kirstine Harvie, Executive Director of Strategic Policy and Legislation, has been awarded a Public Service Medal for her outstanding public service in the provision of human services in Queensland.

As part of the Queen’s Birthday 2019 Honours List, the Public Service Medal is a high-level honour which acknowledges extraordinary service by employees of federal, state, territory and local governments.

Kirstine is a dedicated public servant who, over the past 18 years, has held senior positions across education, child safety, communities and housing portfolios in the Queensland public sector.

In these roles, Kirstine built a strong track record of leading significant reforms to transform human services and achieve better outcomes for citizens. Her dedication to service transformation that emphasises person-centred and place-based solutions has contributed to successful human service delivery across social policy portfolios.

Kirstine has driven a number of key initiatives in our Division including most recently the Renting in Queensland initiative and its ground-breaking statewide Open Doors to Renting Reform consultation program.

Kirstine is highly regarded by the department’s key stakeholders, executive leaders, her colleagues and the members of her team as a passionate public servant, who throughout her career has seen many changes, yet has continued to share her knowledge with others and make a real and lasting difference to people’s lives.

Please join me in congratulating Kirstine on this outstanding achievement.

Trish

Trish Woolley

Deputy Director-General

Housing, Homelessness and Sport

 Customers first Ideas into action Unleash potential Be courageous Empower people Healthy and safe workforce

 

goverment

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“HAVE A GOOD HOLIDAY” – By Des Kelly

Seems very strange that even as I was thinking about all the public holidays now enjoyed in Australia, Christmas day, Boxing day, New Year’s day, May-day, , the Queen’s birthday, Good Friday, Easter day, Melbourne- Cup day, plus one or three more special days, where everyone in this great big Land celebrates them in their own inimitable fashion. 

     Then, out of nowhere, I get this copy of the Sri Lankan Government’s Gazette, declaring their Public and Bank Holidays for 2020, showing the full list, which gets me thinking of yet another “title” for our little homeland in the Indian Ocean. Lanka has been proudly called many things, the Pearl of the Indian Ocean, Tear-drop of India, among others, so I have now decided to call her “Holiday-Island”.

Here folks, is the reason why.

 

Desmond Kelly

 Desmond Kelly.
 (Editor-in-Chief)—eLanka..

Govt issues gazette declaring public and bank holidays for 2020 ; see full list

Source    Sunday Times

A gazette has been issued to announce the days which would be declared as both public and bank holidays in 2020.

Vajira Abeywardena in his capacity as Minister of Internal & Home Affair had issued the gazette notification. 

Accordingly, the list of public and bank holidays for next year are as follows:

  • January 10 (Friday) – Duruthu Full Moon Poya Day
  • January 15 (Wednesday) – Tamil Thai Pongal Day
  • February 04 (Tuesday) – National Day
  • February 08 (Saturday) – Nawam Full Moon Poya Day
  • February 21 (Friday) – Mahasivarathri Day
  • March 09 (Monday) – Madin Full Moon Poya Day
  • April 07 (Tuesday) – Bak Full Moon Poya Day 
  • April 10 (Friday) – Good Friday
  • April 12 (Sunday) – Day prior to Sinhala & Tamil New Year Day 
  • April 13 (Monday) – Sinhala and Tamil New Year Day
  • May 01 (Friday) – May Day
  • May 07 (Thursday) – Vesak Full Moon Poya Day
  • May 08 (Friday) – Day following Vesak Full Moon Poya Day
  • May 25 (Monday) – Id-Ul-Fitr (Ramazan Festival Day)
  • June 05 (Friday) – Poson Full Moon Poya Day
  • July 04 (Saturday) – Esala Full Moon Poya Day
  • August 01 (Saturday) – Id-Ul-Alha (Hadji Festival Day)
  • August 03 (Monday) – Nikini Full Moon Poya Day
  • September 01 (Tuesday) Binara Full Moon Poya Day
  • October 01 (Thursday) – Adhi-Vap Full Moon Poya Day 
  • October 30 (Friday) – Milad-Un-Nabi (Holy Prophet’s Birthday) 
  • October 30 (Friday) – Vap Full Moon Poya Day
  • November 14 (Saturday) – Deepavali Festival Day
  • November 29 (Sunday) – Ill Full Moon Poya Day
  • December 25 (Friday) – Christmas Day 
  • December 29 (Tuesday) – Unduvap Full Moon Poya Day
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Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball – Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY

Please click here or on the Photos below to view the full album on eLanka Facebook page 

Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY

Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY

Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY

Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY

Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY

Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY  Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY  Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY

Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY Black & Gold of NSW-DS.Senanayake College OBA – Sydney Chapter, Presents 2019 Black & Gold Masquerade Ball - Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY

Please click here or on the Photos above to view the full album on eLanka Facebook page 

Photos thanks to CINETHPERERA PHOTOGRAPHY

 



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17 Fascinating Old Words That Deserve To Be Popular Again!

The ever-evolving nature of language has its drawbacks, and one of these drawbacks is that many words fall out of use and are forgotten, becoming obsolete remnants found in dictionaries alone. But some of these rare old words are really cool and can describe things we usually need a whole sentence for. For instance, instead of saying “let’s postpone until the day after tomorrow”, you can simply say “let’s perendinate”, how convenient is that (and also fun to say)? We think that all 17 old words on the list below are missing links in our vocabulary and definitely deserve to be brought back into day-to-day speech. Curious to find out what they are? Just scroll down to view.

Old Words1

Old Words

Old Words

Old Words

Old Words

Old Words

Old Words

Old Words

Old Words

Old Words

Old Words

Old Words

Old Words

Old Words

Old Words

Old Words

 

 

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“FOOD FOR THOUGHT” – By Des Kelly

 

An excellent thought-provoking idea from Neville Davidson, Editor of the Burgher Association in Melbourne, has just arrived, via e’mail, and I lose no time in reiterating his words for the benefit of all our eLanka readers around the World.

I am sure that Neville will agree with me when I say that it really does not matter where we Sri Lankans now reside, we should do everything possible to feed the hungry, whenever & wherever possible. Far too much food is being wasted in THIS Country and every effort should be made, to have all this excess food “collected” and sent off, under refrigeration, of course, to our neighbour 3rd World Countries where food is scarce & people and children are practically starving. Oh, I know that this is being done, even as I write this, BUT, our Governments EVERYWHERE, don’t seem to be able to get their priorities right, spending millions and billions on sometimes unnecessary projects and NOT ENOUGH on the totally NECESSARY task of putting some food into the bellies of hungry people, and providing them with clean water to drink. 

  I feel that Neville has “painted the picture” to perfection, and the accompanying video clip he has sent will cause many a tear. I do hope that we can get together and, in some way, help to reduce this 3rd World starvation JUST THAT LITTLE BIT MORE, so please God, help us to do this.

Desmond Kelly

Desmond Kelly.
 (Editor-in-Chief)—eLanka.

World's saddest picture

Spare a thought ……

Whilst Western countries spend trillions of dollars on Wars, going to the Moon, Mars and, destroy billions of dollars’ worth of excess foods in order to keep the price of domestic consumables at their current level, people die in poorer nations. It is an absolutely disgusting capitalist World isn’t it? The trillions of dollars wasted on egotistical national pursuits could have saved most poorer nations from hunger.  

Neville

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THE STORY OF HAVELOCK TOWN – Richard Boyle Explore Sri Lanka January 2013 – Havelock Town: From rubber plantation to distinctive suburb

HAVELOCK TOWN

Bambalapitiya Road (Havelock Road from 1907) dissecting Havelock Town and Park

 It may be unusual to find a town within a city – unless it’s a Chinatown – but as far as Colombo is concerned, before the creation of Havelock Town and the adjacent Havelock Park in the early years of the 20th Century, this land was outside the residential area, in fact a rubber plantation that formerly cultivated cinnamon, which stretched westwards to Galle Road.
>>>>
>>>> Havelock Town and Havelock Park were named by the Colombo Municipal Council (CMC) to honour Sir Arthur Havelock who, after a distinguished colonial career in which he governed Sierra Leone, Trinidad, and Natal, was appointed Governor of Ceylon from 1890-1895. Havelock is best-known for abolishing the ‘paddy tax’ – an unpopular levy on rice cultivation – extending the railway network to Kurunegala and Bandarawela, and bringing the benefits of medical science and education to all sections of the population.
>>>>
>>>> Lady Havelock was also active in the medical sphere, responsible for creating the country’s first hospital for women and children, which bore her name until 1954 when it ceased to exist. Her name was also perpetuated by SS Lady Havelock, a vessel that, with several others, circumnavigated the Island, providing one of the ultimate tourist experiences.
>>>>
>>>> Soon after the departure of Sir Arthur and Lady Havelock from Ceylon (he became Governor of Madras) there was an attempt to commemorate their contribution to the country. Surprisingly, however, the plan had to be abandoned due to lack of support and public donations were returned. So it was appropriate that Havelock Town, situated 3.7 miles (six kilometres) south of Colombo Fort, was created a few years later.
>>>>
>>>> Described by the main reference work of the period, Twentieth Century Impressions of Ceylon (1907), as “a small residential quarter”, and by George J A Skeen in A Guide to Colombo (1906) as “the latest suburb of the city”, it spanned an oblong area bordered to the north by Dickman’s Road, (now Lester James Pieris Mawatha, and location of the Havelock Town Post Office), and to the south by the Kirulapone Canal, next to which was planted keerai (leafy vegetables) for consumption by the capital’s inhabitants. To the east was Bambalapitiya Road, which divided Havelock Town and its park.
>>>> Perhaps the significant location of this artery prompted the CMC to rename the thoroughfare Havelock Road in 1907.
>>>>
>>>> Probably the most knowledgeable person regarding the history of Havelock Town, in particular the residents of Havelock Road two generations ago, is Hugh Karunanayake, Founding President of the Ceylon Society of Australia. In “The Homes of Havelock Road Fifty Years Ago”, published in the Ceylankan (November 1999), the antipodean magazine concerning Sri Lanka, he comments:
>>>>
>>>> “Havelock Road was the principal link between Central and South Colombo. A good cross section of the community of Colombo lived there enjoying the social, recreational, educational and career opportunities that inevitably arose from living in close proximity to the city centre. Fifty years ago, there were more people from the British and Burgher communities living in Colombo and that was represented in the Havelock Road microcosm. Life was less complicated, and probably more ‘family and friend’ orientated than is possible today.”
>>>>
>>>> The heart of Havelock Town consisted of the parallel, equidistant Layard’s Road, Elibank Road (which was another, more subtle, tribute to Havelock as Elibank was his middle name), and Skelton Road. “Much of the land there belonged to FJ Lucas Fernando, who was among the first to build in that area,” Karunanayake informs me in a personal communication. “His house was called Norwood and had several acres of land around it. Lucas Fernando’s wife was from the Lindamullage de Silva family, which also owned a great deal of land in the Elibank Road, Skelton Road area. Another big landowner was Wellawattege William Peiris who owned the southern end of Layard’s Road.”
>>>>
>>>> Havelock Park was originally 4.5 acres (1.8 hectares) in area but, as Twentieth Century Impressions of Ceylon reveals, among the miscellaneous expenditure of the CMC for 1905 was Rs 30,000 for an extension of six acres (2.4 hectares). By 1907, “the Galle Face, Victoria Park and the Havelock Town Park” were adjudged, by the editor of the book, Arnold Wright, as the major “lungs” of Colombo (surprisingly, the environmental sense of the word lung dates back to 1651).
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>>>> During the early decades of the 19th Century, Havelock Park became – and remains – the home of several sporting clubs, although one, the Havelock Golf Club, shifted to Buller’s Road (Bauddhaloka Mawatha) where the Bandaranaike Memorial International Conference Hall now stands. At the northern end of Havelock Park is the public area named after the national hero, Henry Edward Pedris, a militia officer and prominent socialite who was executed by the British for alleged incitement of racial riots in 1915, a charge later proven false. It is believed that Pedris’ execution and the actions of the British marked the beginning of the Independence movement.
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>>>> Adjacent to Pedris Park, as it is commonly termed, is one of Sri Lanka’s best rugby clubs, the Havelock Sports Club – renovated in July 2012 to celebrate its 97th anniversary – and the Burgher Recreation Club (BRC), whose members played cricket and hockey on the Lucas Fernando land in Havelock Town until the club leased a section of Havelock Park. In the south-east corner is Colts Cricket Club, represented by a first-class team that won the Premier League Tournament Tier A in 2012. Finally, in the south-west corner, is a children’s playground of more recent origin.
>>>>
>>>> According to Hugh Karunanayake, in the late-1930s the Mayor of Colombo, Dr V R Schokman, lived in a house called Valerest opposite Havelock Park. “In its front yard was a beautiful circular sunken garden. In later years the house was converted into a restaurant. Adjoining the northern bund of the canal was the Government Senior School, which later transferred to Maharagama. During the Second World War it housed the Royal Primary School when the entire Royal College complex was used as a military hospital. Today the buildings are home to Lumbini Maha Vidyalaya.”
>>>>
>>>> Inevitably, most aspects of that era have faded away, but the original heart of Havelock Town still preserves some of the suburban tranquillity of the past even though it is surrounded by 21st Century bustle. Moreover, Havelock Park remains one of Colombo’s most important green lungs, a focus of several sporting activities and gathering place for the people of an area zoned as “Colombo 5”.

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SRI LANKA CRICKET NEWS
(MAY 2019)
Compiled by Victor Melder

 

                                                     

 

Sri Lanka have slipped to number nine in the official ICC Rankings that was updated yesterday. Dimuth Karunaratne’s side is ranked sixth in Test cricket. India finished top of the Test rankings while England finished number one in ODIs. The ninth rank is Sri Lanka’s lowest and now they are in jeopardy of not qualifying for further ICC events directly.

ICC Test Team Rankings

1 India 113 (-3), 2 New Zealand 111 (+3), 3 South Africa 108 (+3), 4 England 105 (+1), 5 Australia 98 (-6), 6 Sri Lanka 94 (+1), 7 Pakistan 84 (-4), 8 West Indies 82 (+5), 9 Bangladesh 65 (-3), 10 Zimbabwe 16 (+3)

ICC ODI Team Rankings – Rank Team Points

1 England 123 (-), 2 India 121 (+1), 3 South Africa 115 (+3), 4 New Zealand 113 (+1), 5 Australia 109 (+1), 6 Pakistan 96 (-1), 7 Bangladesh 86 (-4), 8 West Indies 80 (+4), 9 Sri Lanka 76 (-), 10 Afghanistan 64 (-), 11 Zimbabwe 54 (+1), 12 Ireland 46 (+3), 13 Scotland 40 (+7). (Daily Island, 3.5.2019)

Having spent ten days in the United Kingdom acclimatizing to the conditions, the national cricket team will feature in their first game of the long tour when they take on Scotland in an ODI today in Edinburgh. The two match series is preparation ahead of the World Cup campaign that beings early next month. These two games will give an opportunity for the Sri Lankan management to decide on their composition for the World Cup campaign. Players like Angelo Mathews, Kusal Janith Perera and Nuwan Pradeep, who are returning from injuries, will be on show in today’s game. Not just for the three of them, but for majority of Sri Lankan players in the squad, the two games will be an opportunity to find their ODI form. Sri Lanka’s selectors surprised everyone when they picked as many as five players in their World Cup squad, who had not featured in an ODI for more than 18 months. Captain Dimuth Karunaratne and leg-spinner Jeewan Mendis haven’t played an ODI for more than four years. Premier fast bowler Lasith Malinga has been rested for the two games. Scotland and Sri Lanka have played two ODIs so far with Sri Lanka  winning both encounters. The Sri Lanka Squad (From):    Dimuth Karunaratne (Captain), Lasith Malinga, Kusal Mendis, Angelo Mathews, Kusal Janith Perera (wk), Avishka Fernando, Lahiru Thirimanne, Dhananjaya de Silva, Thisara Perera, Isuru Udana,  Milinda Siriwardena, Jeewan Mendis, Jefferey Vandersay, Suranga Lakmal and  Nuwan Pradeep. (Daily Island, 18.5.2019)

The first ODI between Sri Lanka and Scotland yesterday at Edinburgh was called off without a ball being bowled due to inclement weather. (Sunday Island, 19.5.2019)

Britain’s leading newspaper The Daily Telegraph claims that corruption investigations in Sri Lanka will drag on at least till the end of this year and that more individuals will be charged before September, possibly after the World Cup. Sri Lankan cricket is rocked by serious allegations of corruption with former Test captain Sanath Jayasuriya banned from the game for two years and several other individuals charged. Former Fast Bowling Coach Nuwan Zoysa, former Batting Coach Avishka Gunawardene, former all-rounder Dilhara Lokuhettige and Sri Lanka Cricket’s Performance Analyst Sanath Jayasundara have been all charged for various breaches of the Anti Corruption Code. The newspaper reported that the focus of the ICC Anti Corruption Unit at the moment will be to ensure a corruption free Cricket World Cup, the sport’s showpiece event. It said that the investigators have taken the extraordinary step to warn suspected match fixers against travelling to England for the World Cup having launched the biggest ever protection operation ahead of the ten team event that will get underway later this month in England and Wales. As a result, anti-corruption officers will be posted with each of the ten teams, a step undertaken for the first time. In addition, there will be two investigators and one evidence analyst on duty throughout the tournament. The ICC has also taken steps to contact suspected match fixers through solicitors and warned them that they will be thrown out of cricket grounds if they were spotted during a game. The game’s governing body is confident that the World Cup will be clean and poses a low risk due to extra security measures. “Badly run events attract the corrupters and they look for vulnerabilities in events and players but the World Cup is highly organised, well run, well governed and the players are well protected so we expect it to be clean,” Alex Marshall, the General Manager of the ICC’s Anti-Corruption unit was quoted as saying.  (Daily Island, 21.5.2019)

South Africa beat Sri Lanka by 87 runs, to win their ICC World Cup Warm-up match, played at Sophia Gardens, Cardiff, UK. Scores:

South Africa – 338/7 in 50 Overs (du Plessis 88, Amla 65, van der Dussen 40, Phehlukwayo 35, Lakmal 2/63, Pradeep 2/77, Udana 1/42, de Silva 1/44, Mendis 1/45)  

Sri Lanka – 251 all out in 42.3 Overs (Karunaratne 87, Mathews 64, Mendis 37, Phehlukwayo 4/36, Ngidi 2/12, Duminy 1/27, Tahir 1/31, Pretorius 1/34, Rabada 1/40)

Australia beat Sri Lanka by 5 wickets, to win their ICC World Cup Warm-up match played at The Rose Bowl, Southampton, UK. Scores:

Sri Lanka – 239/8 in 50 Overs (Thirimanne 56, de Silva 43, B.K.G.Mendis 24,  B.M.A.J. Mendis 21,Zampa 2/39, Smith 1/9, Maxwell 1/14, Cummins 1/23, Starc 1/38, Lyon 1/48)

Australia – 241/5 in 44.5 Overs (Khawaja 89, Maxwell 36, Marsh 34, Stonis 32, Vandersay 2/51, de Silva 1/17, Pradeep 1/28, Siriwardana 1/28)

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