“Yathuru Pokuna” – amazing craftsmanship of Anuradhapura era – By Arundathie Abeysinghe   Located in close proximity to *Jethawanaramaya Monastery in Anuradhapura, Yathuru Pokuna (meaning “Key Pond” in English) is a marvelous craftsmanship of our forefathers. There are three ponds known as “Yathuru Pokuna”, two in Jethawanaramaya Monastery Complex and one in *Maha Vihara Complex in close proximity to *Ruwanweliseya and the unique *Buddhist Railing. The design of “Yathuru Pokuna” (Key Pond) resembles a key. According to scholars, the Ponds have been utilized to obtain water for the rituals of the Bodhigara (Bo tree shrine) of Jethawanaramaya Monastery. According to *Mahawamsa, these ponds (also known as wells) would have been constructed during the era of King Agghabodhi II of *Anuradhapura Kingdom in the 7th century (608 to 618). These ponds are circular in shape and are not much deep. The walls of the ponds are constructed with bricks and steps ...

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Strategic significance of Trincomalee Harbor By Arundathie Abeysinghe   Located on the East Coast of Sri Lanka, in *Trincomalee, approximately 350 kilometers north of the key East-West shipping lanes of the Indian Ocean, Trincomalee Port is formed by a large natural deep-water harbor, the fifth largest natural harbor as well as one of the finest natural harbors in the world. It is the most valuable asset of Sri Lanka. According to historical data in *Mahawamsa, the great Chronicle, Trincomalee Port had been first occupied in the 5th century and was known as “Gokanna”.  Trincomalee Harbor has been a sea port from the period of ancient Sri Lankan Kings and has attracted sea farers such as Marco Polo and Ptolemy as well as Sea Traders from China and East Asia. As such, during early and medieval period, sailing ships had found a haven in Trincomalee Port. Situated on a peninsula in ...

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Ranmasu Uyana – paradigm of garden architecture By Arundathie Abeysinghe   Parks were a prominent feature of city planning during Ancient Kingdoms even before Buddhism was introduced to Sri Lanka during the era of King Devanampiyatissa (247 BC – 207 BC). According to chronicles, after the arrival of *Arhat Mahinda, King Devanampiyatissa had donated these parks to Buddhist monks to be used as Buddhist hermitages.  According to chronicles, Ranmasu Uyana (meaning Gold Fish Park) had been used as a pleasure garden (Magul Uyana in Sinhala) for the sensual enjoyment by royals, an alternative to those donated to Buddhist monks.  The Park has beautiful, plants, trees, vines as well as flowering shrubs as described in literary texts of Sinhala Literature, beauty and elegance of yesteryear. According to Professor Senake Bandaranayake, former Professor of Archaeology:  “Sri Lanka is perhaps the only country in South Asia where we still have substantial archaeological remains ...

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