Hopper Night at Toongabbie DISH

When Chef Manjula Fernando decided to close down DISH Restaurant in Toongabbie to concentrate on his thriving Glebe restaurant, the Sri Lankan community that patronized this cosy and homely eatery quickly went into action; calls, email and sms messages along with whatsapp notifications went rampant to secure table bookings for the final clout of the famous “All you can eat hopper feed”.  Large table bookings were made well in advance and the typical “last minute” diners were placed on a waiting list and some, regrettably missed out entirely.  It was a sell-out night and the entire restaurant was packed to capacity. Manjula and his very courteous staff lived up to expectation and did not disappoint the loyal diners who converged for this last hurrah. 

“A lot of people had been asking me to open in the city,” said Manjula. “Sri Lankans can more easily bring their friends to Glebe. They would tell me there was no proper place to take their friends to try real Sri Lankan food”.  With several restaurants already operating in the western suburbs (mostly kaddai style with a couple of exceptions) the restaurant which he opened in Glebe two years ago has proved to be a success with its open-kitchen layout. 

It was a sad day in many ways for the faithful diners and staff alike at Toongabbie. Having occupied these premises for 4 years, the ‘last supper’ on May 17th was a fitting way to bring the curtain down with a fine selection of accompaniments for the hopper obsessed patrons!

Maestro guitarist and singer Roger Menzies was in attendance fittingly supported by well-known Sri Lankan personality, the ageless and bouncing with energy Walter Seneviratne and the golden voice of Guy Varley. Well known music personality, Desmond De Silva a diner that night kindly obliged   with a cameo appearance and when saxophonist extraordinaire Loxly Attan stepped up to the plate, it was sheer musical delight ; a section of the restaurant quickly transformed into a dance floor to burn off the calories of a delightful dinner.

Sri Lankan Consul General Mr. Lal Wickrematunge graced this occasion and very kindly made a presentation acknowledging the tremendous work Manjula, his wife and staff have rendered towards the Sri Lankan community at large.   

We thank the loyal staff at Toongabbie DISH for their services over the years and wish Mangula and his team the best of luck at Glebe – DISH Restaurant is situated at 381 Glebe Point Rd, Glebe, NSW

(Open for Lunch & dinner, closed Tuesdays)

Click here or on the photos below to view the full album on eLanka Facebook page

Hopper Night - Toongabbie DISH Hopper Night - Toongabbie DISH Hopper Night - Toongabbie DISH Hopper Night - Toongabbie DISH Hopper Night - Toongabbie DISH Hopper Night - Toongabbie DISH Hopper Night - Toongabbie DISH

 

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Community Watch – Engaging and intervening for a safer Sri Lanka

Aubrey JoachimBy Aubrey Joachim

To Sri Lanka and Sri Lankans terrorism is not a new experience. The country suffered a 30 year scourge where the intent of the perpetrators was achieving a specific political and demographic outcome. The country is now facing a type of terrorism driven by an entirely different global agenda – one of ideology and hate of a way of life that is alien to the warped beliefs of a particular minority group. How Sri Lanka became fertile ground for such ideology is a topic for another day. The immediate need is for a strategy to curb and eliminate the cancerous spread of this malice not just in Sri Lanka but wherever it may take root. It must also be recognised that an ideology cannot be confined to geographical or spatial boundaries. Its tentacles can permeate across physical borders – much like crypto currencies in the world of fintech. Major global terrorism incidents have been choreographed and managed via the dark web and often from locations far removed from the actual incidents. Welcome to the age of disruptive terrorism.

It is in this context that it was very fitting for the Sri Lanka Consulate in Sydney to organise a gathering of Sri Lankan diaspora to meet with NSW Police to understand some of the complexities and inter-relationships between the incidents back in Sri Lanka and the Sri Lankan community in New South Wales – just as it would be relevant to Sri Lankan diaspora anywhere in the world. Officers from various quarters of NSW Police as well as the Community engagement Manager of Multicultural New South Wales, addressed the 100-strong gathering representing different Sri Lankan community groups at the Redfern Town Hall last Wednesday.

NSW Police Bias Crime Coordinator Mark Dance and Liason Officer Jade Istanbouli set the tone for the rest of the evening. Their key message was that in order to tackle bias crime aka ‘hate crime’, engagement and intervention was the key. The multi-cultural liaison coordinator advised the audience that multi-cultural community liaison officers were spread across a number of local area Police Commands and could be communicated with in confidence should there be any cause for concern among the community in the context of suspicious activity. A detective inspector explained the processes adopted by the Police to pre-empt criminal activity. He even said that the Easter Sunday bombings in Sri Lanka had triggered processes where the Sri Lankan community at this end came under observation to prevent any fallout. He urged the community to be vigilant and observant. To a question from the floor regarding the context of vigilance he replied that anything unusual needed to be brought to the attention of the Police, no matter how trivial.

How should therefore the Sri Lankan community in Australia contribute to preventing hate crime at this end, in Sri Lanka or even further afield? While the fight against all forms of crime has kept abreast of technological evolution it now depends extensively on analytics and insight to prevent incidents. The data required to monitor and track such crime must be harvested from a number of sources. Crime agencies anywhere have significant access to publicly available data as well as specific data captured by various government agencies, financial institutions and the like. However, of significant importance in the current context of hate related terrorism is visual and sentiment data. Sentiments are at the heart of bias/ hate crime. Such data cannot easily be captured by sensors or devices. Humans are the best oracles for capturing such data. Do we observe suspicious behaviour? Do we notice objects that are out of place in particular surrounds? Do we notice a shift in attitude and mindset of persons? Are dress and personal appearances of individuals changing? Do we observe out-of-character comments made by individuals? Such data needs to be brought to the attention of the authorities. In this digital age anyone can contribute to prevention of biased crime. How often are radical comments or views on social media ignored? Can social media patterns be observed? Such observations are invaluable sources of sentiment data and in this day and age every concerned citizen must play their part in harvesting this data. This is a major role that the wider community can play in the current context.

In bringing the evening to a close, Consul General Mr. Lal Wickrematunge made some pertinent comments to the audience that perhaps sheds some light on how and why Sri Lanka finds itself in its present predicament and how the country and its people can rise above the setbacks. The major observation is that we must recognise that we are ‘one’ Sri Lanka. For far too long we have let language, religious and ethnic/ racial biases influence our collective thinking. This weakness has allowed fault lines to emerge and misdemeanours within groups go unchecked. If as a collective Sri Lankan diaspora in Australia we are to be the eyes and ears for preventing hate related incidents back home – irrespective of the perpetrator groups, then we have to be united as ‘one’ Sri Lankan diaspora shedding ethnic and religious differences and instead confronting good versus evil.

Photos from The NSW Police Briefing for the Sri Lankan Community in Sydney

Click here or on the photos below to view the full album of photos on eLanka Facebook page

 

NSW Police Briefing for the Sri Lankan Community in Sydney  NSW Police Briefing for the Sri Lankan Community in Sydney NSW Police Briefing for the Sri Lankan Community in Sydney NSW Police Briefing for the Sri Lankan Community in Sydney NSW Police Briefing for the Sri Lankan Community in Sydney NSW Police Briefing for the Sri Lankan Community in Sydney NSW Police Briefing for the Sri Lankan Community in SydneyNSW Police Briefing for the Sri Lankan Community in Sydney

NSW Police Briefing for the Sri Lankan Community in Sydney NSW Police Briefing for the Sri Lankan Community in SydneyNSW Police Briefing for the Sri Lankan Community in Sydney

Community Watch – Engaging and intervening for a safer Sri Lanka

Aubrey JoachimBy Aubrey Joachim

To Sri Lanka and Sri Lankans terrorism is not a new experience. The country suffered a 30 year scourge where the intent of the perpetrators was achieving a specific political and demographic outcome. The country is now facing a type of terrorism driven by an entirely different global agenda – one of ideology and hate of a way of life that is alien to the warped beliefs of a particular minority group. How Sri Lanka became fertile ground for such ideology is a topic for another day. The immediate need is for a strategy to curb and eliminate the cancerous spread of this malice not just in Sri Lanka but wherever it may take root. It must also be recognised that an ideology cannot be confined to geographical or spatial boundaries. Its tentacles can permeate across physical borders – much like crypto currencies in the world of fintech. Major global terrorism incidents have been choreographed and managed via the dark web and often from locations far removed from the actual incidents. Welcome to the age of disruptive terrorism.

It is in this context that it was very fitting for the Sri Lanka Consulate in Sydney to organise a gathering of Sri Lankan diaspora to meet with NSW Police to understand some of the complexities and inter-relationships between the incidents back in Sri Lanka and the Sri Lankan community in New South Wales – just as it would be relevant to Sri Lankan diaspora anywhere in the world. Officers from various quarters of NSW Police as well as the Community engagement Manager of Multicultural New South Wales, addressed the 100-strong gathering representing different Sri Lankan community groups at the Redfern Town Hall last Wednesday.

NSW Police Bias Crime Coordinator Mark Dance and Liason Officer Jade Istanbouli set the tone for the rest of the evening. Their key message was that in order to tackle bias crime aka ‘hate crime’, engagement and intervention was the key. The multi-cultural liaison coordinator advised the audience that multi-cultural community liaison officers were spread across a number of local area Police Commands and could be communicated with in confidence should there be any cause for concern among the community in the context of suspicious activity. A detective inspector explained the processes adopted by the Police to pre-empt criminal activity. He even said that the Easter Sunday bombings in Sri Lanka had triggered processes where the Sri Lankan community at this end came under observation to prevent any fallout. He urged the community to be vigilant and observant. To a question from the floor regarding the context of vigilance he replied that anything unusual needed to be brought to the attention of the Police, no matter how trivial.

How should therefore the Sri Lankan community in Australia contribute to preventing hate crime at this end, in Sri Lanka or even further afield? While the fight against all forms of crime has kept abreast of technological evolution it now depends extensively on analytics and insight to prevent incidents. The data required to monitor and track such crime must be harvested from a number of sources. Crime agencies anywhere have significant access to publicly available data as well as specific data captured by various government agencies, financial institutions and the like. However, of significant importance in the current context of hate related terrorism is visual and sentiment data. Sentiments are at the heart of bias/ hate crime. Such data cannot easily be captured by sensors or devices. Humans are the best oracles for capturing such data. Do we observe suspicious behaviour? Do we notice objects that are out of place in particular surrounds? Do we notice a shift in attitude and mindset of persons? Are dress and personal appearances of individuals changing? Do we observe out-of-character comments made by individuals? Such data needs to be brought to the attention of the authorities. In this digital age anyone can contribute to prevention of biased crime. How often are radical comments or views on social media ignored? Can social media patterns be observed? Such observations are invaluable sources of sentiment data and in this day and age every concerned citizen must play their part in harvesting this data. This is a major role that the wider community can play in the current context.

In bringing the evening to a close, Consul General Mr. Lal Wickrematunge made some pertinent comments to the audience that perhaps sheds some light on how and why Sri Lanka finds itself in its present predicament and how the country and its people can rise above the setbacks. The major observation is that we must recognise that we are ‘one’ Sri Lanka. For far too long we have let language, religious and ethnic/ racial biases influence our collective thinking. This weakness has allowed fault lines to emerge and misdemeanours within groups go unchecked. If as a collective Sri Lankan diaspora in Australia we are to be the eyes and ears for preventing hate related incidents back home – irrespective of the perpetrator groups, then we have to be united as ‘one’ Sri Lankan diaspora shedding ethnic and religious differences and instead confronting good versus evil.




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NSW Police Briefing for the Sri Lankan Community in Sydney on Wednesday, 15 May 2019

NSW_Police

To: 

Heads of all Sri Lankan Community Associations/Organisations in Sydney;

Sri Lankan expatriate community;

Students.

On the request of the Sri Lankan community in Sydney, Consulate General together with the NSW Police has arranged a Briefing on services provided by the NSW Police and safety of the community.

Details of the event are as follows,

Date: 15 May 2019
Time: 6.00pm to start at 6.30 pm
Venue: Redfern Town Hall, 73 Pitt Street, Redfern NSW 2016
Dress code: Casual
RSVP: by Monday, 13 May 2019 by email to slcg.sydney@mfa.gov.lk

You and members of your organisation are invited to participate at this important briefing.

Police officers from different Police command areas will take part at the briefing giving the opportunity to the audience to raise concerns, questions and discuss about safety and security from the NSW Police.

 

Kindly note that seating is available only for 150 invitees, and the event is by registration only. Therefore, please inform the names of the members of your organisation who wish to attend the briefing, at your earliest.

Best Regards,

Lal Wickrematunge
Consul General

 Sri lanka country (state)

Consulate General of Sri Lanka
Level 11, No. 48 Hunter Street
Sydney NSW 2000
Tel. (02)  9223 8742 /  9223 8729
Fax  :  (02) 9223 8750

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SriLankaConsulateSydney/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/SLinSydney

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Lanka Start up Ecosystem – Investor Forum in Sydney

Wednesday 17th April 2019 

Consulate General of Sri Lanka in Sydney along with BOV Capital, Colombo and Grant Thornton, Sydney organised an Investor Forum showcasing the Start-up Ecosystem in Sri Lanka on Wednesday 17th April 2019. Over 50 entrepreneurs who are keen to understand and look at investment potential in the Lankan Start up Ecosystem participated in the Investor forum and the business networking.

Over the last 10 years, there have been a meaningful change in innovation and entrepreneurship in Sri Lanka. Country has gone for a small, but vibrant and differentiated Start up Ecosystem, such as, creating awareness about entrepreneurship, creating a network of mentors who work with these companies, helping entrepreneurs to build the capacity, providing seed and follow on funding and helping companies to accelerate their growth.

Consul General, Lal Wickrematunge in his welcome speech invited the Australian entrepreneurs to invest in the Sri Lankan Start up Ecosystem as the environment was now conducive for more business opportunities in Sri Lanka.  He also highlighted that Sri Lanka is on its way to becoming a very powerful technology and innovation hub. “If we can get it right, we believe that we can get Sri Lanka to be a tech and innovation powerhouse in near future” he said.

Mr. Prajeeth Balasubramaniam, General Partner, BOV Capital Limited made the presentation on potentials for investment in Start-up Ecosystem in Sri Lanka.  In his presentation he highlighted that young Sri Lankan talent is coming back to the country and wanting to build companies.  They have a world view but wanted to be in Sri Lanka on its growth path.  Lots of innovation potential is available in the domestic market. He said that Simplex has become the leading ecom logistic company in 24 months with annual revenue of US $ 1 million. BOV Capital continues to play an integral role in Lanka’s Start up Ecosystem. BOV Capitals plan is to raise a series of funds over the next 10 years and is currently raising capital for Angel network. Mr. Raj Deepan, Partner, Grant Thornton Australia Limited also spoke at the Investor Forum.

Consulate General of Sri Lanka in Sydney

1st May 2019

Lanka Start up Ecosystem - Investor Forum in Sydney1

Lanka Start up Ecosystem - Investor Forum in Sydney2

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Networking Meeting with Sri Lanka Institute of Nano Technology (SLINTEC) Endowment Trust Fund – Photos by eLanka: 

Video by Dr Harold Gunatillake

Speech by Himalee Arunatilaka – Deputy High Commissioner; Sri Lanka High Commission, Canberra, (on behalf of the High Commissioner Hon S.Skandakumar)

Download the PDF file .

 

 Please click here or on the photos to view the full set of photos on eLanka Facebook page

Please click here or on the photos to view the full set of photos on eLanka Facebook page

Networking Meeting with Sri Lanka Institute of Nano Technology

Networking Meeting with Sri Lanka Institute of Nano Technology (SLINTEC) Endowment Trust Fund – Photos by eLanka SLINTEC with the assistance of the Consulate General of Sri Lanka in Sydney presented the strategy on SLINTEC Endowment Trust Fund to help the advanced scientific research in Sri Lanka. The SLINTEC Endowment Trust Fund has been established for the purpose of advancing the energy in the area of Nano Technology for the benefit of the public. This include funding scientific research in the area of Nano Technology, funding specific research projects identified by the settlor funding and the creation of a vehicle through which members of the public can be shareholders of scientific research in Sri Lanka. Mr. Hiran de S. Wijeyeratne, CEO and the senior officials from SLINTEC made a presentation to the members of Sri Lankan Diaspora in Sydney on the Endowed Trust Fund and engaging the Sri Lankan Diaspora members to be a partner in science, engineering, technology and re-awakening in Sri Lanka. Consul General of Sri Lanka in Sydney Lal Wickrematunge and Himalee Arunatilaka – Deputy High Commissioner; Sri Lanka High Commission, Canberra, (on behalf of the High Commissioner Hon S.Skandakumar) explained the importance of the Sri Lankans in Sydney being part of the SLINTEC groth strategy. Dr Gihan Amaratunga professor of Engineering & Head Electronics Power and Energy Conservation at the University of Cambridge; who also heads up the Research & Innovation at SLINTEC. presented SLINTECs involvement in Nano Science. The evening was well attended followed by Networking between the Sri Lankan Diaspora of Sydney with the SLINTEC Officials.

Report by eLanka

 

 

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