eLanka Newsletter – 27th March 2022 – 8th Edition – Sri Lankans In Australia Click here or on the image below to read this week’s elanka Newsletter A CHAMPION OF CHAMPIONS – by Des Kelly Professor Wije Ariyaratne – Live Interview on Saturday 19 March with Nine Radio Perth on 90th anniversary of the Sydney Harbour Bridge Sri Lanka Lions Sports Club – New South Wales Presents Under 16’s Junior Cricket Carnival 2022 09 APR 2022 at Raby Oval (Sydney event) Good News From Jayam April 1, 2022 Pls Scroll Down 35 items Silverscene – Official Newsletter of the Silver Fawn Club Inc (Brisbane) – March / April 2022 A FISHERMAN’s PRIDE AND JOY – by Quintus de Zylva TWO GREAT SPORTSMEN OF A BYGONE ERA – by Quintus de Zylva AUSLMAT DONATIONS – by Quintus de Zylva Sri Lanka – Aurudu-Nakath 2022 (in Sinhala) Shane Warne Graham Norton Tokyo ...

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Jeff Thomson emphasising his KILLER Image-by MICHAEL ROBERTS Source:Thuppahis Jon Hotten, in The Guardian, 20 June 2013, where the title is “Reminiscing with Jeff Thomson, who tells a story the way you want to hear it” It was a few hours after David Warner had taken a swing at Joe Root in a Birmingham bar, and Jeff Thomson was standing in a marquee full of people with a microphone in his hand. We were there to play six-a-side cricket, but the rain was coming down and the buffet was excellent, so Thommo had a full house. He was wearing the hooray uniform of red jeans and a blue blazer; set upon his broad shoulders and pipecleaner legs it made him look like the kind of guy who joins a soap opera and makes off with the unsuspecting widow’s money. ...

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Nationalist Studies and the Ceylon Studies Seminar at Peradeniya, 1968-1970s-by Michael Roberts Source:Thuppahis The years 1966 to 1975 were heady days in Ceylon. Especially so for some of us in Peradeniya Univeristy where the CEYLON STUDIES SEMINAR was launched in November 1968 by a few members of the Arts Faculty assisted by the facilities provided by Professor Gananath Obeyesekera at the Sociology Department – located then on Lower Hantane Road away from the centre of teaching. Not least among these facilities was the service provided by the Sociology Department peon Sathiah[i] who cyclostyled the written seminar papers beforehand for circulation so that those who were keen could read any presentation beforehand if they so wished – a procedure that also maximized discussion time. This background service was seconded by the typing services of Mrs Hettiarachchi in the History Department and Mr Kumaraswamy in the Sociology Department.  A . Jeyaratnam Wilson   Gananath Obeyesekera This ...

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Australia vs Ceylon at the Colombo Oval in March 1953 … and Constantine-by Michael Roberts Source:Thuppahis In focusing on Learie Constantine’s spell as a coach in the island in 1953 I was prompted initially by his report on the one-day encounter between the Australian cricket team led by Lindsay Hassett and a Ceylon team, a “whistle-stop game” as it was known then because the Aussies played such matches on their way to England by ship on several occasions dating from the early decades of the 20th century. The details of this encounter were presented in 1998 in the book Crosscurrents. Sri Lanka and Australia at Cricket, by Michael Roberts & Alfred James under the cover of Walla Walla Press.[1] I was able to present such reports because of my convivial interaction with one of Sri Lanka’s star batsman, CH ‘Channa’ Gunasekara, whose scrapbook was a goldmine of news cuttings.[2] These details include reviews of ...

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Australian Nationalism and the Ideology of Sacrificial Devotion-by Michael Roberts “Archie” Source:Thuppahis Michael Roberts, being an abridged version of an old article presented in the Library of Social Science run by Richard Koenigsberg and others. Addressing the practices of remembrance in Australia, Richard Koenigsberg has noted the irony that a battlefield defeat at Gallipoli in World War One, 1915, served a people as an emblem of nationhood: the “Australian nation, came into being on the foundations provided by the slaughter of its young men.” There is more irony. The commemoration of Australian courage, sacrifice and manliness at Gallipoli (and subsequently on the Somme) was threaded by tropes of youthful innocence that drew on classical Hellenic motifs. While the monuments and epitaphs that were crafted in Australia to mark this event were manifestly Greek in form. The gendered masculine metaphor, in turn, was often embodied in the seminal image of a full-bodied blonde young man. “Archie Hamilton” in ...

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The Burgher Elite and the British Raj-by Michael Roberts George F Nell, Louis Nell, C. A. Lorenz,  James Alwis and Charles Ferdinands moving anti-clockwise Source:Thuppahis Preamble:[1] In locating the Burghers in ‘social space’ the book People Inbetween deploys statistical detail, text and quotation to place them within the Ceylonese middle class of British Ceylon.[2] The socio-political clout which accrued to the Burgher segment of the middle class is further illustrated by indicating the complex ways in which they fulfilled intermediary roles between the mass of the people and the British rulers and/or between powerful segments of the majority community, the Sinhalese. The extract printed below is a section of Chapter 6 [in People Inbetween] devoted to this purpose and is reproduced without citations. The best known of the intermediaries in the British Raj, of course, were the headmen, whether the cohorts of lower-echelon headmen or the top layers represented by the maniagars, ratēmahatmayas, and mudaliyars. In the low-country districts the latter were ...

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In Appreciative Memory of Karen Roberts, 1965-2018-by Michael Roberts Source:Thuppahis It has been something of a shock for me to discover that the Sri Lankan authoress Karen Roberts[1] had passed away in USA in 2018 while only in her middle-aged fifties (about the same age as my daughters). What a tragedy!   My links with Karen are three-fold. Firstly, her novel July is centred on the cataclysmic set of events in Sri Lanka in late July 1983 when Tamils residing in the south-central regions of the island were assailed in shocking ways. The imprint of this awful event on my reflections is embodied in an ethnographic essay of my own which was written up in 1991 and is as much a heartfelt literary essay[2] as a documentary-political account: namely “The Agony and Ecstasy of a Pogrom: Southern Lanka, July 1983.” Secondly, I was familiar with her lineage links because I had banged into one ...

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A Tale of Resistance: The Story of the Arrival of the Portuguese-by Michael Roberts Source:Thuppahis An ABSTRACT of an article that appeared in print in Ethnos, 1989, vol 54: 1 & 2,  pp. 69-82…. available online for payment to Taylor & Francis. This essay decodes a sixteenth century folktale which records the Sinhalese reaction to the arrival of the first Portuguese. Where the historiography has interpreted this tale as benign wonderment in the face of exotica, a piecemeal deconstruction of the allegorical clues in the ‘story is utilised to reveal how the Sinhalese linked the Portuguese with demons and with Vasavarti Mārayā, the arch enemy of the Buddha. In this fashion the Portuguese and the Christian sacrament of communion were represented as dangerous, disordering forces. ...

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DON BRADMAN AND HIS MEN IN CEYLON – by Neville Jayaweera An essay from the book “Essaying Cricket Sri Lanka and Beyond” authored by Michael Roberts Source:Adelaideaz The image of Don Bradman exercised almost a mesmeric hold over the imagination of my generation, i.e. of those born in the 1930s, in (then) Ceylon. The dominion he exercised was so absolute that even now, sixty something years on, most of that generation would claim that there never was and never will be anyone like the Don taking guard at a batting crease. Speaking for myself, having watched cricket in England during the past thirty summers that I have been living here, I can vouch that no batsman I have seen ever came nigh Bradman. Neither in run getting nor in amassing statistics, neither in the capacity to concentrate nor in the fleetness of foot, neither in the murderous power of driving ...

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