DESMOND KELLY




 

        “THE JAM-FRUIT TREE IS NO MORE” – By Des Kelly

Carl Muller, born 22nd Oct.,1935, died 2nd Dec., 2019, at home in Kandy, Sri Lanka, surrounded by his wife & family.

He had just turned 84, wanted, and got a quiet funeral, with only family & close friends attending, and now lies in a Cemetery in the Town where he was born

     One may ask, what is so special about this ?, people are dying every day, and where does the Jam-fruit tree fit in ?.

Well, although I did not know Carl personally, he, together with Denis Roberts, a good friend of mine, joined the Royal Ceylon Navy as Signalmen, serving under Rear Admiral Royce de Mel, the Captain of the Navy of that particular Era.

     Where does the Jam-fruit tree fit in ?, well, in addition to Serving in the Navy, and later, in the Army, Carl Muller was a brilliant writer/journalist, whose trilogy of books, Under the Jam-fruit Tree, Yakada Yaka, and Once upon a tender time, gained International recognition, so, Carl became famous, especially for his Jam-fruit tree depiction of how the minority of Ceylon Burghers lived & loved in Ceylon, in the good old days. This tongue-in-cheek description won him the much coveted Gratiaen Memorial Prize of 1993. He also wrote “Children of the Lion” which earned him the State Literary award, plus many more books on various subjects, all beautifully written with his natural flair for writing.

     I write this on behalf of eLanka, sending our sincere sympathy to his wife & family, on their sad loss. It is simply a brief introduction to a touching Vale’ tribute to his father, from eldest son, Ronnie. Carl Muller, you may be gone now, but your “words” live on. May you rest in eternal peace.

Desmond Kelly
 (Editor-in-Chief)  eLanka.

Carl Muller – In memory of our father   

At two o’clock on the morning of the 2nd of December 2019, Carl Muller breathed his last.

He had been suffering from dementia that was getting progressively worse during his last years. He lost the ability to write, to figure out numbers, to differentiate dreams from reality. He forgot our names and he could become erratic and angry and things he could not understand, but more when he could not make himself understood.

He was cared for up until the very end by family. My mother would not send him away to a home and she stayed by him and cared for him stolidly until his last breath – concern for her own health pushed away in sacrifice to Dad. Minette, my sister, was there too… helping, caring and praying. Michelle, the eldest of my two sisters, lives next door and her prayers for Dada’s health and recovery were insistent.

I was not there by his side when he breathed his last, but my mother and my sister Minette were. I got the call at a few minutes past two in the morning, and I knew with a sinking heart that the call would be to tell me that my Dada was gone.

There is a painful weight on my chest as I write these words, knowing I will never see him again. It started when I saw my sister’s name on the screen of my that morning, and it hasn’t subsided yet. It feels like a painful breath that I cannot quite catch.

My father, Carl Muller accomplished much in his life. He was a seaman, then a military man. He married young and when that marriage ended, left him, quite literally, holding the baby. He brought up his first son, Ronnie, more or less on his own.

He did not marry again until he turned 35. I remember him laughingly telling us how my Mum’s parents did not know whether they were sitting or standing with how quick he married my mum. He met her in April, was engaged in May and married in June. He knew he had found his bride and wasted no time tying the knot.

If Dada were with us, he and Mum would have had their 50th anniversary this coming June.

He had a temper, and could instill the fear of God into us, yet he also had such heartfelt compassion that he could calm our fears with the tenderness of his voice.

He was a musician; played the piano by ear and had a gift for being able to play anything that he heard. He had a wicked sense of humour and a rare gift of writing satire and comedy. He was prolific in his writing, words were always his friends, and he could string them together to tell stories or expound facts as he saw fit.

Carl was the kind of man that could still a room with the sound of his voice, he was well read and extremely knowledgeable and his writing eventually got him recognition as a veteran journalist, first Sri Lankan author to be internationally published with his book ‘The Jam Fruit Tree’ and this same publication winning him the Gratien Award. He was honoured by the State, being bestowed with the title ‘Kala Keerthi’. He also won numerous State Literary Awards which still hang proudly on the walls of our home today.

He was a serious and disciplined man, but he could never resist the opportunity to have a laugh with friends and loved ones, given half the chance.

My father was this famous person that we grew up with – well-known, respected, much talked about – but to us he was just ‘Dada’.

There is sadness, yes, but there is also relief. Just before his dementia set in, he opened himself to the possibility of redemption and, eventually, accepted Christ into his life. My father’s intellect has always been his strength but had also been his adversary. He would argue for and against a God that blessed us as a family, yet also took away my younger brother Destry at a very young age many years ago. He blamed God for taking my brother away yet pleaded with the same God to give him the assurance he would see Destry again.

It is with this assurance that we laid him to rest. He was known to say that he always wanted to go out with a bang, but eventually he shared with us his wish to have only his dearest and closest around him when he was finally ready to go.

It is in respect and honour of his wishes that we held his funeral quickly and quietly, with only his family and close friends around him.

It was a simple ceremony where he was finally laid to rest at the Mahaiyawa Cemetery at one o’clock in the afternoon on the 2nd of December 2019.

He lived 84 years and he is finally at peace. He leaves behind his wife, Sortain Muller, his eldest son, Ronnie Muller, eldest daughter, Michelle and her husband Udaya Chandra and, his second daughter Minette and her husband Derek Melder, his second son, Jeremy Muller and his wife Roshella, and his grand-children Judy, Marlon, Brandon, Shalini, Alina, Kian, Shane, Angelina, Vivienne and Jessie, and we will all miss him dearly.

Goodbye Dada. You have gone to finally meet Destry who we said farewell to those many years ago, and we will all meet you again someday, when our time too will come.

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“THE JAM-FRUIT TREE IS NO MORE” – By Des Kelly

 Carl Muller, born 22nd Oct.,1935, died 2nd Dec., 2019, at home in Kandy, Sri Lanka, surrounded by his wife & family.
He had just turned 84, wanted, and got a quiet funeral, with only family & close friends attending, and now lies in a Cemetery in the Town where he was born
     One may ask, what is so special about this ?, people are dying every day, and where does the Jam-fruit tree fit in ?.
Well, although I did not know Carl personally, he, together with Denis Roberts, a good friend of mine, joined the Royal Ceylon Navy as Signalmen, serving under Rear Admiral Royce de Mel, the Captain of the Navy of that particular Era.
     Where does the Jam-fruit tree fit in ?, well, in addition to Serving in the Navy, and later, in the Army, Carl Muller was a brilliant writer/journalist, whose trilogy of books, Under the Jam-fruit Tree, Yakada Yaka, and Once upon a tender time, gained International recognition, so, Carl became famous, especially for his Jam-fruit tree depiction of how the minority of Ceylon Burghers lived & loved in Ceylon, in the good old days. This tongue-in-cheek description won him the much coveted Gratiaen Memorial Prize of 1993. He also wrote “Children of the Lion” which earned him the State Literary award, plus many more books on various subjects, all beautifully written with his natural flair for writing.
     I write this on behalf of eLanka, sending our sincere sympathy to his wife & family, on their sad loss. It is simply a brief introduction to a touching Vale’ tribute to his father, from eldest son, Ronnie. Carl Muller, you may be gone now, but your “words” live on. May you rest in eternal peace.
Desmond Kelly
  Desmond Kelly
     (Editor-in-Chief)

Carl Muller – In memory of our father   

At two o’clock on the morning of the 2nd of December 2019, Carl Muller breathed his last.

He had been suffering from dementia that was getting progressively worse during his last years. He lost the ability to write, to figure out numbers, to differentiate dreams from reality. He forgot our names and he could become erratic and angry and things he could not understand, but more when he could not make himself understood.

He was cared for up until the very end by family. My mother would not send him away to a home and she stayed by him and cared for him stolidly until his last breath – concern for her own health pushed away in sacrifice to Dad. Minette, my sister, was there too… helping, caring and praying. Michelle, the eldest of my two sisters, lives next door and her prayers for Dada’s health and recovery were insistent.

I was not there by his side when he breathed his last, but my mother and my sister Minette were. I got the call at a few minutes past two in the morning, and I knew with a sinking heart that the call would be to tell me that my Dada was gone.

There is a painful weight on my chest as I write these words, knowing I will never see him again. It started when I saw my sister’s name on the screen of my that morning, and it hasn’t subsided yet. It feels like a painful breath that I cannot quite catch.

My father, Carl Muller accomplished much in his life. He was a seaman, then a military man. He married young and when that marriage ended, left him, quite literally, holding the baby. He brought up his first son, Ronnie, more or less on his own.

He did not marry again until he turned 35. I remember him laughingly telling us how my Mum’s parents did not know whether they were sitting or standing with how quick he married my mum. He met her in April, was engaged in May and married in June. He knew he had found his bride and wasted no time tying the knot.

If Dada were with us, he and Mum would have had their 50th anniversary this coming June.

He had a temper, and could instill the fear of God into us, yet he also had such heartfelt compassion that he could calm our fears with the tenderness of his voice.

He was a musician; played the piano by ear and had a gift for being able to play anything that he heard. He had a wicked sense of humour and a rare gift of writing satire and comedy. He was prolific in his writing, words were always his friends, and he could string them together to tell stories or expound facts as he saw fit.

Carl was the kind of man that could still a room with the sound of his voice, he was well read and extremely knowledgeable and his writing eventually got him recognition as a veteran journalist, first Sri Lankan author to be internationally published with his book ‘The Jam Fruit Tree’ and this same publication winning him the Gratien Award. He was honoured by the State, being bestowed with the title ‘Kala Keerthi’. He also won numerous State Literary Awards which still hang proudly on the walls of our home today.

He was a serious and disciplined man, but he could never resist the opportunity to have a laugh with friends and loved ones, given half the chance.

My father was this famous person that we grew up with – well-known, respected, much talked about – but to us he was just ‘Dada’.

There is sadness, yes, but there is also relief. Just before his dementia set in, he opened himself to the possibility of redemption and, eventually, accepted Christ into his life. My father’s intellect has always been his strength but had also been his adversary. He would argue for and against a God that blessed us as a family, yet also took away my younger brother Destry at a very young age many years ago. He blamed God for taking my brother away yet pleaded with the same God to give him the assurance he would see Destry again.

It is with this assurance that we laid him to rest. He was known to say that he always wanted to go out with a bang, but eventually he shared with us his wish to have only his dearest and closest around him when he was finally ready to go.

It is in respect and honour of his wishes that we held his funeral quickly and quietly, with only his family and close friends around him.

It was a simple ceremony where he was finally laid to rest at the Mahaiyawa Cemetery at one o’clock in the afternoon on the 2nd of December 2019.

He lived 84 years and he is finally at peace. He leaves behind his wife, Sortain Muller, his eldest son, Ronnie Muller, eldest daughter, Michelle and her husband Udaya Chandra and, his second daughter Minette and her husband Derek Melder, his second son, Jeremy Muller and his wife Roshella, and his grand-children Judy, Marlon, Brandon, Shalini, Alina, Kian, Shane, Angelina, Vivienne and Jessie, and we will all miss him dearly.

Goodbye Dada. You have gone to finally meet Destry who we said farewell to those many years ago, and we will all meet you again someday, when our time too will come.

  

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“OUR PARENTS” – By Des Kelly

 

It’s almost Christmas, again. Many will spend this joyous season at home, as a family, parents and all.

These are the lucky ones. A better Christmas present would be impossible to find. Parents and their “family” together.

We have to remember that EVERYONE has two special gifts from a loving God, a Father & a Mother. However, by Christmas time, each year, some of these “gifts” have already been recalled by their Maker, and are no longer with us. Even as I write this, my two Parents lie together in their eternal sleep, but this does not mean that I have forgotten them. They will still be the BEST PRESENTS that I was lucky enough to receive .

          So, while officially wishing everyone out there, a very Happy Christmas, on behalf of eLanka, let me please feed you some psyche, rather than Christmas cake (which you have plenty of, already), into your minds, and this is, do not, now or EVER, forget to include your parents in your festivities.

They may, or may not be with you, physically, but, at least, they should be there, in your midst, in Spirit, after all, you do owe your “good times” to them. NEVER FORGET YOUR PARENTS. I will never forget mine. This is the only “gift” I have to offer my readers, this Christmas. It is gratis, this advice, so please accept it in the spirit of how it’s given.

As the superb article below this introduction shows, straight from the heart. 

Desmond Kelly

Desmond Kelly.
(Editor-in-Chief)—eLanka.

> A long time ago, there was a huge apple tree. A little boy loved to come and play around it every day. He climbed to the treetop,
>
> ate the apples, and took a nap under the shadow. He loved the tree and the tree loved to play with him.
>
> Time went by, the little boy had grown up and he no longer played around the tree every day.
>
> One day, the boy came back to the tree and he looked sad.
>
> “Come and play with me”, the tree asked the boy.
>
> Boy: “I am no longer a kid, I do not play around trees anymore” the boy replied. “I want toys. I need money to buy them.”
>
> Tree: “Sorry, but I do not have money, but you can pick all my apples and sell them. So, you will have money.”
>
> The boy was so excited. He grabbed all the apples on the tree and left happily. The boy never came back after he picked the apples. The tree was sad.
>
> One day, the boy who now turned into a man returned and the tree was excited.
>
> “Come and play with me” the tree said.
>
> “I do not have time to play. I have to work for my family. We need a house for shelter. Can you help me?”
>
> “Sorry, but I do not have any house. But you can chop off my branches to build your house.” So the man cut all the branches of the tree and left happily.
>
> The tree was glad to see him happy but the man never came back since then. The tree was again lonely and sad.
>
> One hot summer day, the man returned and the tree was delighted.
>
> “Come and play with me!” the tree said.
>
> “I am getting old. I want to go sailing to relax myself. Can you give me a boat?” said the man.
>
> “Use my trunk to build your boat. You can sail far away and be happy.”
>
> So the man cut the tree trunk to make a boat. He went sailing and never showed up for a long time.
>
> Finally, the man returned after many years.
>
> “Sorry, my boy. But I do not have anything for you anymore. No more apples for you”, the tree said.
>
> “No problem, I do not have any teeth to bite” the man replied.
>
> Tree : “No more trunk for you to climb on.”
>
> “I am too old for that now” the man said.
>
> “I really cannot give you anything, the only thing left is my dying roots,” the tree said with tears.
>
> “I do not need much now, just a place to rest. I am tired after all these years,” the man replied.
>
> “Good! Old tree roots are the best place to lean on and rest, come sit down with me and rest.” The man sat down and the tree was glad and smiled with tears.
>
> This is a story of everyone. The tree is like our parents. When we were young, we loved to play with our Mum and Dad.
>
> When we grow up, we leave them; only come to them when we need something or when we are in trouble.
>
> No matter what, parents will always be there and give everything they could just to make you happy.
>
> You may think the boy is cruel to the tree, but that is how all of us treat our parents.
>
> We take them for granted; we don’t appreciate all they do for us, until it’s too late.
>
> ~ Moral ~
> Treat your parents with loving care…. For you will know their value, when you see their empty chair…
>
> We never know the love of our parents for us; till we have become parents.👏👏

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“THE DRINK” – By Des Kelly

Vadakaha Sudhiya” was a drink that was so famous in “Olde Ceylon”, I later recorded a song about it. Although I am 100% tee-total @ my present stage of life, I have to admit that, had I stayed in My Lovely Island Home, and remained in the Royal Ceylon Navy, I would certainly not be writing this article, right now. In fact, I would have been “pushing up daisies” a long time ago. To make a long story short, during those halcyon days, alcohol & I were very good friends indeed. The reason for this was simple. It was a legacy left by my grandfather, Jack Kelly, born in Dublin, who drank everything but water, plus the fact that, if you joined the Navy, you were supposed to follow the lead of most of the “senior guys” and drink, smoke & be merry, or else leave the bloody Navy and join the Girl-Guides. 

Now that I’ve made my excuses, lets get down to this interesting bit of information for all eLanka readers everywhere.

Desmond Kelly

Desmond Kelly.
(Editor-in-Chief)– eLanka.

eLanka Special!! Buy the song for $2 from eLanka shop now! – Click here or on the image below!

 

 

 

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“FROM THE ISLAND OF SLAVES” – By Des Kelly

 I remember Slave Island very well. While it was quite handy to the Fort of Colombo, it wasn’t even “in the running”

finance-wise. While I am uncertain of the details of this “Sorry-Suburb”, I guess that it was a focal point from which Slaves were procured, to be the Servants of the rich and famous. It did come under the jurisdiction of Colombo 2, and quite possibly had some input into the building of “Elephant House” (the Slaves, I mean), a fairly large, but ordinary 1 storied building, taken over, and managed by the “Suddhas”, who served their customers with the best butter, cheese, puddings, eclairs, chocolates, etc., that we, in Colombo 4 (Bambalapitiya) couldn’t afford. 

     Yes, I remember Slave island and Elephant House very well, but look at the joint now. From the time when a dollar in American money seemed to represent a fortune, and where the TALLEST building in Fort was the 7 storied Times of Ceylon, in Prince Street, to BILLIONS of Dollars, Thirty-storied Cinnamon Life Tower, plus many other towers, towering and thrusting themselves into the skies of Colombo. Please read and enjoy this transformation of Slave Island into a veritable Millionaires’ Complex.

Desmond Kelly

Desmond Kelly.
(Editor-in- Chief)  eLanka.

Cinnamon Life office tower to open in March

Source:Daily News

One of the iconic landmarks of Colombo and the single, largest, private investment in Sri Lanka (US$ 1 billion) Cinnamon Life by John Keells Group, is rapidly progressing where the structural work of all buildings are now complete.

“Cinnamon Life office tower would be ready to be handover by March 2020. In addition, the residential buildings, the hotel and the mall will be completed by March 2021,” said Chief Marketing Officer and Executive Vice President of John Keells Group, Roshanie Moraes.

Roshanie Moraes

The ‘Office Tower’ is a 30-storeyed A-grade workspace designed on a ‘shell and core concept’ with each floor consisting of a usable 10,564 Sq. feet area. Ten Floors of the office tower, from Level 20 to 30, would be for sale, while Level 6 to18 would be for leasing. “This tower would be the hub and driver of innovation and vibrancy in Sri Lanka’s corporate arena.”

Several modern sustainability measures were introduced with rain water harvesting for toilet flushing / urinal flushing for Low zone offices and Dual flushing cisterns for toilets for the project. 5G connectivity too is provided.

Pre-marketing for the project is already on the way, while the response is encouraging. Several regional global corporate offices based in India are keen to relocate or move some for operations to Sri Lanka, while multi nationals too, wish to have their regional offices at Cinnamon Life.

“The prime attraction is Sri Lanka’s living conditions, including quality education and the safety aspect. In addition, the Cinnamon Life’s location and its close proximity to the Colombo Port City where major economic activity is to take place once its operational, is another plus point when it comes to marketing. Commenting on the 32nd Floor, 800 guest rooms, 5 star Cinnamon Hotel and Mall, she said that Cinnamon Life is expected to be the hub for MICE (Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions) activities in Sri Lanka, especially attracting large scale MICE events from India. It would also have Sri Lanka’s largest 1,800 slot hotel car park.

“The Hotel offers over 4,444 sq.m. of ballroom and conference facilities in addition to the related pre-function areas and external entertainment spaces. Banquet style seating capacity is available for 3300+ individuals and conference style seating could host 5,000+ individuals at any given time.”

The hotel, which is the largest in Sri Lanka, would be home to 20 restaurants and bars, including six specialty restaurants, housed within the tower along a ‘Sky Lobby’ at Level 24, with separate VIP lobbies and drop offs. The 12 floor Retail Mall, comprises of five levels of retail space with a gross floor area of 24,489 sq m., including a Retail Mall service area retail/café spaces on the ground floor and excluding car parks which are across six floors. “This would add value to both hotel guests and residents in apartments.”

The Mall would also feature some of the best entertainments put together by the Cinnamon management.

The pre-sales of the 47 Floors residential towers too, has begun and has a ‘good sales apatite,’ despite the general slowdown in the residential market. “The residential towers are expected to attract expats working and living in Colombo as well.”

She said that 65% of the apartments have been sold out, while out of the buyers, 65% are local investors, 25% expats and 10% foreign investors. She said that tourism recovery was faster than they anticipated and settling political situation too would be an advantage for the future of the real estate and tourism sector.

The total revenue from the sale of the residential apartments and 10 floors of the commercial office space of the “Cinnamon Life” project is estimated to be USD 250 million. (SS)

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“VERILY VERALU” – By Des Kelly

What an absolutely amazing World this is.

Immediately brings to mind, the old “Veralu-achcharu” woman, seated just outside the main gate of St.Peter’s College, Bambalapitiya, selling little parcels of her delicious achcharu to us schoolboys, both, at the morning tea interval and lunch interval, a snack that was always welcome, at about 20 cents a serve, if I remember it correctly. Each 

achcharu pack contained about three veralus, less the large seed, of course, amalgamated in a spicy mix of other little berries, ginger & garlic, ground into a small, thick mixture that got the taste-buds going, like nothing else could. 

If you are Sri Lankan, and have not tried Veralu-achcharu, you have missed out on a delicacy too good to be true. 

          Now, from the old, to the new,, comes this very interesting piece on the Veralu (out of the blue), nothing to do with Vera, it’s true, but it rhymes beautifully, too. Please read and enjoy something that is endemic to Sri Lanka. 

Folks, this is “Verily-Veralu”.

Desmond Kelly

Desmond Kelly.
(Editor-in-Chief)– eLanka.

Secrets of Veralu – By Ishara Jayawardane

Monday, November 25, 2019 – 01:00    –   DAILY NEWS

Veralu

The Veralu/Ceylon Olive is an astonishing doppelganger of its Mediterranean namesake, Institute of Indigenous Medicine, Department of Dravyaguna Vignana, Senior Lecturer, Dr. S. D. Hapuarachchi. Green Thumbs speaks to Hapuarachchi about the fruit.

Globally, more and more people are switching to personal care products that are alcohol and SLES free that is made with natural ingredients. Veralu is one such product that is completely natural.

“Veralu is an indigenous tree and commonly found in Sri Lanka. The plant is commonly grown in the dry zone of Sri Lanka. It is an Asian tropical fruit. The Ceylon olive trees are naturally grown in home gardens across the country. The tree usually measures from 8 to 15 meters in height and 5 to 10 meters in width. The plant is commonly grown in the dry zone of Sri Lanka. This sun loving tree grows on Loam soil and requires low maintenance,” said Hapuarachchi.

Hapuarachchi also pointed out that you can use the Veralu as a vegetable as well as a fruit. You can use it to make Veralu achcharu, veralu malu, veralu sambol. Veralu juice too is in high demand. It is prepared by slicing the Veralu into pieces, mix it with water and blend it to get the juice. Then all you need to do is to add sugar and salt. Nuts, pea nuts can be eaten alongside Veralu juice. You can add Veralu to smoothies, ice cream and jelly. Ice cream made out of Veralu is also increasing in popularity particularly among the local youth. The Whole fruits are combined with diced shallots to make a mixture called country mustard.

“It is packed with antioxidants and research has revealed that the Veralu fruit is rich in minerals, vitamins, fiber and valuable antioxidants. Due to its nutritional content, Veralu has been used in traditional Sri Lankan medicine for centuries,” said Hapuarachchi.

For a fruit so little it is one of the giants when it comes to health benefits. The Ceylon olives possess anti-inflammatory, antibiotic, anti-anxiety, analgesic, antidepressant and antihypertensive properties. Elaeocarpus serratus/ Veralu is used in rheumatism and is an antidote for poison.

“The bark of the Ceylon olive tree is used to treat hemorrhages and gastric disorders. The paste of the leaves has been known to be a cure for ulcers. The fruits are used in the treatment of dysentery and diarrhea. It is also used to treat abscess, fungal infection, joint swelling and Eczema,” said Hapuarachchi.

One reason why Veralu is so marketable is because it solves a lot of lifestyle issues like looking good and looking dapper. With the very appearance conscious youth, the fruit is high in demand.

Hapuarachchi added that the Veralu is highly useful for someone in the public eye as they need to be well groomed. A natural form of hair care Sri Lankans have been using the fruit as a natural form of hair care for generations. The mashed Veralu leaves are applied on the hair before a bath to make hair smooth and glossy. It protects the natural moisture of the hair while making it bright and silky. Ceylon olives are a natural anti-dandruff agent and protect hair from lice and dirt. It helps to maintain healthy hair while repairing damaged hair. Many personal care manufactures are currently using extracts of Veralu to formulate anti-dandruff shampoos.

“As I stated above Veralu is for your pride and confidence as well. Numerous personal care and food companies have begun to promote value added products made out of Veralu.

Sri Lanka can benefit from this increasing global trend by supplying high quality personal care products that are made from herbal ingredients such as Veralu.

In addition to providing health benefits Veralu is a fruit/vegetable that can bring economic and financial benefits. When you take the international market there is potential for Sri Lankans when it comes to exporting Veralu. Sri Lankans are not the only ones who want to look good!!!

Currently, Sri Lankan Ayurveda herbal shampoo and conditioners made out of Veralu are sold in the local and international markets.

However, the long term health benefits of such products need to be communicated to the local and international consumers.

Health facts

VERALU

* It is packed with antioxidants.

* The Veralu fruit is rich in minerals, vitamins, fiber and valuable antioxidants.

* The Ceylon olives possess anti-inflammatory, antibiotic, anti-anxiety, analgesic, antidepressant and antihypertensive properties. Elaeocarpus serratus/ Veralu is used in rheumatism and is an antidote for poison.

* The fruits are used in the treatment of dysentery and diarrhea. It is also used to treat abscess, fungal infection, joint swelling and Eczema,”

VERALU LEAVES

The Veralu leaf extracts can be utilized to produce effective ointments to treat ulcers, Eczema and fungal infections of the skin. More research can also be conducted on the manufacture of anti-bacterial and anti-depressant medicines using Veralu as a key ingredient. The constipating effect of the fruit can be made to use by manufacturing capsules that are effective against diarrhoea.

VERALU JUICE

Possess anti-inflammatory, antibiotic, anti-anxiety, analgesic, antidepressant and antihypertensive properties

VERALU BARK

The bark of the Ceylon olive tree is used to treat hemorrhages and gastric disorders. 

 

 

 

 

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“SARONG-SATIRE” – By Des Kelly

 

So, whats new ?. From a totally personal experience, 

due to ankylosin-spondylitis (a slow deterioration of the spinal cord), this writer has had to change part of his attire, and wear the “Sarong” full time. Truth is, I cannot go through the procedure of wearing trousers anymore, simply because I can hardly lift my bloody legs, in order to get into them, and rather than run around naked, scaring people, I found out that the good old Sarong was now the garment for me. In India, they call it the “Lungi”, but I know very little about India, so I won’t go “lunging” into anything.

          So, what’s new ?, I say again, It now seems, that at the age of 83 + the Editor of eLanka will now be “in fashion” once again. Proud to be associated with the very best Website for all Sri Lankans, everywhere, trouserless, yet colourfully sarong clad, I now bring all our millions of readers everywhere, this startlingly “Breaking News”

“The Lungi & Jungi, aside, your trousers & slacks you can hide, THE SARONG IS BACK, get them on, JACK!!!.

 

Desmond Kelly

  Desmond Kelly.
(Editor-in-Chief)-eLanka.

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 “DEVIL-DANCING” – By Des Kelly

 

This was what it was called in the Ceylon I remember.

If someone got very ill, especially mentally, the Devil Dancers would be called on to perform their rituals in order to rid the devils out of the patient.This devil dancing would be carried out overnight, normally featuring two or three people, and it was a “Buddy Rich, eat your heart out” situation, when these drummers from Lanka started to do their thing. This, together with the dancing & chanting would, under normal conditions, make any devil want to get the hell out of there (pardon the pun), and, even for total disbelievers like myself, I once watched one of these rituals, and, at the given time of midnight, noticed the branches of a nearby coconut tree shudder and shake violently, as the devil made his exit, hopefully to drink a thambili or two, en route to where he/she came from. This is a true story, coming to you from one who was once in a cemetery at midnight, and was mistaken for a ghost, himself, but this will have to wait, for the moment. 

Desmond Kelly

Desmond Kelly
(Editor-in-Chief)  eLanka.

Conjuring the gods in a musical frenzy – By Kerrie O’Brien

When someone is unwell in Sri Lanka and conventional medicine can’t provide a cure, it may be time to call in the drummers.

Though the practice is now in decline, drummers and dancers are occasionally still summoned to offer astrology-based healing rituals to beckon good spirits and restore health.

Other ceremonies are offered in the lead-up to childbirth, to bring on a bountiful harvest or even to cast out “demons” for people with psychological issues. The drumming and dancing is often joined by singing and the action can become quite frenetic.

Drummer Sumudi Suraweera, founder of the Baliphonics ensemble, says a decade ago several of these ceremonies were held each weekend; now they occur only once every few months. The decline is in part what inspired him to create Of Deities and Demons, a show by Baliphonics and the Australian Art Orchestra, coming to Sydney and Melbourne next month.

Baliphonics, a Sri Lankan group, perform music inspired by traditional rituals.

Part of the AAO’s Meeting Point Series bringing together musical styles from around the world, Of Deities and Demons features composer/drummer Suraweera, two dancers – brothers Susantha and Prasanna Rupathilaka – and Reuben Derrick on bass clarinet, together with members of the orchestra. In previous incarnations of Baliphonics, the dancers’ father performed with them; he was an astrologer and was able to read the stars to determine what kind of ritual was required.

Born in Sri Lanka and raised in New Zealand, Suraweera studied the rituals for his doctorate before returning to Sri Lanka a decade ago. Dismayed at the lack of music in the Sri Lankan school curriculum, with its emphasis on exams and strict, formulaic teaching, he set up the Music Matters foundation, giving children the chance to improvise and play in an ensemble from an early age. He also stages gigs at night, showcasing jazz and other forms of improvisational music.

The term “Bali”, he explains, has nothing to do with the country. “It literally means offering … It’s an offering for the deities associated with astrology – just as there are nine planets, there are nine deities associated with them. In a practical sense, for most Sinhalese, horoscope is quite a big thing. In my generation maybe less and less so, but up to the previous generation it was big.

“It gets written when you are born and can be consulted at any point, especially at the important moments in your life. When you’re going through a rough patch, if mainstream help doesn’t work, you might consult the horoscope.”

People would consult an astrologist to see if any of the planetary deities were in a bad place; during the ritual they would invoke these deities and make an offering, he says.

Peter Knight, artistic director of the Australian Art Orchestra, met Suraweera in Sri Lanka last year when he and his son, a keen drummer, visited. The show, he says, “has moments of melodic beauty but also moments of frenetic drumming, and singing over the top, which is beautiful and strange, and the dance is amazing. Beyond that, it’s new, so Sum and his group have never worked with such a large ensemble before.”

Working separately in Sri Lanka and Australia posed no challenge; Suraweera has created a “map” of sorts for all the musicians, which details the composition. But it is not to be followed religiously.

“The nice thing about the map is that you can leave that track for a bit, and go your own way and then come back to it and there are cues,” Knight says. “So there’s this nice sense of something holding the whole thing together and a freedom for us to work our way through it.”

Along with Knight playing trumpet and electronics, the show includes fellow Art Orchestra members Reuben Lewis ( trumpet and electronics),  Carl Dewhurst (guitar) and Mary Rapp (cello). Some of the orchestra worked with Suraweera when he came to their annual workshop in Tasmania in September, but the idea was not to rehearse endlessly.

“When we get a bit closer, we’ll all be listening to it and then we’ll meet in Sydney and we’ve got two days to pull it all together,” Knight says. “There is a sense of slight danger, a bit of creative risk there. I like that feeling where you haven’t dotted all the Is and crossed all the Ts, there’s a bit of room.”

It’s been a busy few months for Knight and his fellow orchestra members. Ten members of AAO recently returned from Europe and China. After a week-long tour in China, they headed to the Berlin Jazz Festival, where they spent a week as ensemble in residence, playing to big crowds.

“There’s a real audience for more esoteric musical work in Europe; when I take my music there or when we go there with the Art Orchestra, people get it straight away,” Knight says.

Even so, he argues there are things we do in Australia in quite a sophisticated way; the Meeting Point Series is an example of what can be achieved  through cross-cultural collaborations.

“It’s about creating meeting points between different musical ideas and particularly different cultures. We most recently did a concert with a Korean taegum [Korean flute] soloist from Seoul. All of us are improvisers. Improvisation is also a key aspect of a lot of non-Western musical traditions, and so we think of improvisation as … an inter lingua, that’s beyond language … also, in terms of hierarchy, it’s pretty equal, it’s not one person telling another what to do, [it’s] having a conversation and seeing what rises.

“I’m all about opening up conversations – get people together, get them to play, you don’t have to do much – you just have to create a space.”

Of Deities and Demons is at Annandale Creative Arts Centre, Sydney, December 7; and The Pavilion, Arts Centre Melbourne, December 8.

Arts Centre Melbourne and Australian Art Orchestra present : Meeting Points Series: Of Deities and Demons featuring Sumudi Suraweera and Baliphonics -Presented as part of Mapping Melbourne 2019

8 December 2019 | The Pavilion

Sunday 8 Dec

5:00 PM

More information – https://www.artscentremelbourne.com.au/whats-on/2020/festivals-and-series/meeting-points/of-deities-and-demons

 

Ecstatic music and dance from Sri Lanka

In a rapturous celebration of ancient Sri Lankan culture, Baliphonics and Australian Art Orchestra bring age-old rituals to life through traditional dance, chanting and music.

In a spectacle of dance, music and light, this unique group draws upon an astrological healing practice known as Bali Ritual, in which deities are invoked and demons exorcised.

On a recent trip to Sri Lanka, Peter Knight (Artistic Director, Australian Art Orchestra) formed a friendship with leader of Baliphonics, Sumudi Suraweera. This friendship formed the start of an exciting collaboration combining the yak bera (demon drum), clarinets and other traditional instrumentations with the signature experimental jazz stylings of Australian Art Orchestra.

This Meeting Points Series exclusive will thrill audiences through an intense and visceral experience, bringing together the powerful artform of Sri Lankan ritual music with Australia’s leading contemporary ensemble.

About Meeting Points Series

A contemporary concert series for the curious.

Meeting Points Series is an intimate collection of concerts curated by Peter Knight, Artistic Director of Australian Art Orchestra. Returning for its third year, this program brings together musical styles and performers from across the globe in a series of unexpected collaborations. Experience a mesmerising series of never-before-seen works and cross-cultural compositions in our most exciting line-up yet.

Artist Line-Up

Meeting Points Series is a creative collaboration between Arts Centre Melbourne and Australian Art Orchestra.

Sumudi Suraweera – composer, drummer and music producer
Susantha Rupathilaka – dance and voice
Prasanna Rupathilaka – dance, yak bera and voice
Reuben Derrick – clarinets
Peter Knight – trumpet
Reuben Lewis – trumpet
Carl Dewhurst – guitar
Mary Rapp – cello

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“ADVERSITY-PROSPERITY” – By Des Kelly

  Very often, miles apart, to reach even a semblance of prosperity from dire adversity, is something very few of us can accomplish, but, here we have a shining example of this Sri Lankan lass, through sheer determination, making it, from the very nadir, to the pinnacle of success, to finally become the highest paid “Woman-Company Executive Officer”(C.E.O.)in Australia. Just think about it. From one of the tiniest Islands in the sun, to one of the largest Island Continents in the World. A Sri Lankan C.E.O. who is not just a Woman, but also the highest paid one, for the very first time. I’ll say no more, except to congratulate the lady, on behalf of the thousands of Sri Lankan Patriots around the World. You may have heard about it already, but eLanka now gives you the full story of this truly amazing feat.

Desmond Kelly

Desmond Kelly.
(Editor-in-Chief)– eLanka.

1.                 How a young girl forced to flee Sri Lanka with her family and just $200 to their name overcame adversity to become Australia’s highest paid CEO – By BRITTANY CHAIN FOR DAILY MAIL AUSTRALIA 

 Source:Daily Mail –

  • The highest paid CEO in Australia and her family immigrated from Sri Lanka 
  • Shemara Wikramanayake arrived in Australia when she was 14 years old
  • The family had just $200 to their names, but went on to all become successful
  • Her older sister is a top lawyer and her younger brother is a surgeon 

The highest paid CEO in Australia and her family immigrated from Sri Lanka with just $200 to their names when she was 14 years old.

Macquarie Group chief executive Shemara Wikramanayake became the first female to take the spot as Australia’s highest paid CEO on Tuesday, taking home $18million during the 2018/19 financial year.

The 57-year-old and her two siblings have all found success since they arrived in the country as teenagers.

Shemara’s older sister Roshana is a top lawyer at the NSW Bar Association while her younger brother is employed as a surgeon in rural NSW.

Macquarie Bank Managing CEO Shemara Wikramanayake during a media briefing

Her father Ranji previously told the Australian Financial Review the family had enjoyed a life of privilege growing up in Sri Lanka, but that they fell on tough times before finally settling in Australia in 1975.  

The Wikramanayake’s came from a long line of highly educated barristers and powerful figures. 

Ranji graduated from medical school in 1958 and moved to London with his wife, Amara, for further training in the same year.

The young couple settled down and started a family in England. They had two daughters, Roshana in 1960 and Shemara the following year.

Shemara Wikramanayake

Shemara Wikramanayake, in 1983 with her extended family. From left, brother and future surgeon Priyan, aunt Anna Maria, uncle and barrister Nimal, Shemara aged 21, sister and future lawyer Roshana and mother Amara

In 1962, when Shemara was just one, the family returned to their home in Ceylon, Sri Lanka, with most of their extended family.

Ranji had been hired as a consultant physician at Colombo General Hospital at just 32 years old. Despite his youth, he was considered one of the top five physicians in the country.

During this period, he developed an interest in researching diabetes – a passion which would one day flourish in Australia.

The couple gave birth to their third child, a boy named Priyan, and shortly after they relocated back to England.

Political unrest and unfounded allegations against Ranji’s father – a successful barrister – forced the family to flee Sri Lanka and return to London. 

But the move was costly.

Shemara’s uncle previously told the AFR the entire family once ‘had a very privileged life… we didn’t want for anything,’ but when they arrived in England, they came with very little.

Ranji struggled to find permanent work in the medical industry during his second stint in London.

He filled in for other doctors and commuted to Birmingham for weeks at a time, where he slept in hospital quarters Monday-Friday just to get by.

So in 1975, Ranji made a call on the future of his family. They would move to Sydney, where he was offered a part time job at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital.

When they arrived, they had their possessions and $200 cash. 

‘We lost everything in 1970 and we started life again,’ Ranji previously told AFR. ‘And we started everything again when we moved to Sydney.’  

Macquarie Group’s incoming CEO Shemara Wikramanayake poses for a portrait ahead of the Macquarie Group’s Annual General Meeting

The family rented for six months before scrounging together the money to buy their first home in the harbourside suburb of Rose Bay. 

From there, they were able to purchase another home in the exclusive Vaucluse overlooking Sydney Harbour. 

Shemara and her sister were enrolled in the exclusive $34,000-a-year Ascham School. 

Shemara’s older sister Roshana went on to become a senior policy lawyer at the NSW Bar Association, while her younger brother works at the Southern Highlands Private Hospital in Bowral as a surgeon.

On Tuesday, Shemara was officially named the highest paid CEO in Australia – making history as the first female executive to take the title.

Her $18million salary was $5million more than the next corporate boss, according to OpenDirector’s annual CEO pay report for the Australian Financial Review. 

Macquarie Group CEO Shemara Wikramanayake ahead of the Macquarie Group annual general meeting

The former corporate lawyer earned a base salary of $722,000 but her remuneration package swelled with performance bonuses and share options.

She earns more than $346,000 a week or more than 211 times an average Australian full-time worker’s $85,000 salary leading the investment bank and financial services group, dubbed the ‘millionaires’ factory’.

The English-born banking veteran last year became Macquarie Group’s first-ever female managing director and CEO. 

She had previously worked for the company in nine cities across the globe, and was first hired in 1987. 

In 2019, she was also named one of the American Fortune magazine’s ‘Most Powerful Women’ for her work tackling climate change and her other role with the World Bank’s Global Commission on Adaptation.

Ranji said his daughter doesn’t discuss her personal life in the public sphere, as is company policy.

But he did say they are part of ‘an amazing family. We are very private people… Under impossible odds, we have all succeeded.’ 

2.  The highest-paid CEO in Australia is a woman for the first time ever, as Macquarie Group CEO Shemara Wikramanayake surges to the top – By SHARON MASIGE

Source:Business Insider –

Shemara Wikramanayake is Australia’s highest paid CEO. Image credit: Louie Douvis, SMH

  • Macquarie Group CEO Shemara Wikramanayake is the highest paid CEO in Australia, the first woman ever to top the AFR’s CEO pay survey.
  • Wikramanayake earns more than $18 million dollars, followed by Goodman CEO Gregory Goodman – $12.8 million – and CSL CEO Paul Perreault – $11.7 million.
  • Wikramanayake was also named one of Fortune’s Most Powerful Women.

It’s no surprise Macquarie’s CEO is making bank, but this time it’s different.

Macquarie Group’s CEO Shemara Wikramanayake is the highest-paid chief executive in Australia – becoming the first woman to take the title position – according to The Australian Financial Review’s latest CEO pay survey.

Wikramanayake topped the latest list with a reported pay of more than $18 million, according to the survey, conducted by data company OpenDirector. It ranks the 50 highest-paid CEOs in the country, using figures based on the total pay listed in annual reports.

Wikramanayake was one of four women on the list including Coca-Cola Amatil CEO Alison Watkins ($4.1 million), Mirvac Group CEO Susan Lloyd-Hurwitz ($4.8 million), and Fortescue Metals CEO Elizabeth Gaines ($5 million).

Wikramanayake was announced as managing director and CEO of Macquarie Group back in July 2018, taking over from Nicholas Moore. She made history at the time by becoming Macquarie’s first female CEO.

Starting at the investment bank – known informally as the ‘millionaires’ factory’ – in 1987, Wikramanayake ascended in rank to head up Macquarie’s asset management division in 2008 and eventually CEO. During her time, Wikramanayake has worked in nine cities across six continents and established Macquarie’s corporate advisory offices in New Zealand, Hong Kong and Malaysia.

In 2019, Wikramanayake was named one of Fortune’s ‘Most Powerful Women’ internationally. According to Fortune, Wikramanayake focused on climate change this year, becoming one of a handful of CEOs to be named as a commissioner of the World Bank’s Global Commission on Adaptation. The initiative, which counts Bill Gates and UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon among its list of commissioners aims to ramp up action to fight climate change.

Who else made it on the list

Only five CEOs earned over $10 million dollars in the AFR’s CEO pay list. Following Wikramanayake’s more than $18 million pay was Gregory Goodman, CEO of property company Goodman ($12.8 million), biotech company CSL’s CEO Paul Perreault ($11.7 million), Treasury Wine Estate CEO Michael Clarke ($11.4 million) and BHP CEO Andrew Mackenzie ($10.5 million).

Qantas CEO Alan Joyce ranked 18th on the list at $6.6 million, a 14.7% decrease from the year before.

Earlier this year the Australian Council of Superannuation Investors (ACSI) revealed the 10 highest-paid CEOs in the ASX200 listed companies in the 2018 financial year. The ACSI list, however, looked at the ‘realised pay’ – the value of cash and equity received – with Qantas boss Alan Joyce topping the list at the time at $23.9 million.

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“AUSSIE INVENTIONS” – By Des Kelly

 

For a country that is still a baby, history-wise, it is amazing that so many inventors have surfaced, and still continue to do so, in many areas of this great brown island continent.  

The first “invention” to catch my eye was the rotary clothes-line, featured in the backyard of many homes. these were unheard of, in Ceylon, where dhobies used to manually collect all the “dirty clothes”, take them away (after mum had made a written list of everything collected), to check that nothing was missing when the dhobie-man brought them back, spotless, ironed, & ready to wear, after the next lot went out. only the very affluent folk had washing machines, dryers etc., and we were anything but.!!  i still remember the dhoby quarters in Ceylon, which we used to visit when we needed something urgently. out, would come the item/s needed, and the dhoby would move over to a large wooden table, ironing boards were unheard of, pull out this huge steel iron, open it up and reload the contraption with smouldering hot coconut shells and iron the garments swiftly, charging us an extra rupee or two, for this additional service. 

Here, in Australia, we didn’t have any dhobies, but Mum did all the washing in a second-hand washing machine, then carting the lot out, to the rotary clothes hoist, hung them out to dry, brought them in, herself, ironed those that needed to be ironed, with a nifty little electric iron, and folded the rest.

So much for the new-fangled clothes hoist, but let us now go on with many more iconic Inventions of Australia.

Desmond Kelly

Desmond Kelly
(Editor-in-Chief)  eLanka.

Some  Iconic Australian Inventions

Iconic Australian inventions

We take a look back at the inventions invented by Aussies.

Didgeridoo

Didgeridoo

The didgeridoo can arguably be classified as the first Australian invention, and is still prominently used today. 

The wind instrument was developed by Indigenous Australians around 1000 to 1500 years ago. Playing the didgeridoo involves a complex breathing technique called circular breathing – breathing through the nose and breathing out of the mouth at the same time. 

Traditionally, only males and can play the didgeridoo during ceremonial events.

Australian Rules Football (1858)

An iconic Australian sport, Aussie Rules has been played since June 1858 and was originally established as a means to keep cricketers fit during the winter.

In 2002, the Australian Football International Cup began with the tournament being held every three years. Australia, however, cannot participate. 

Brennan Torpedo (1874)

Brennan Torpedo (1874)

Invented by Louis Brennan in 1874 and patented in 1877, the Brennan Torpedo was propelled by two rotating propellors that were spun by rapidly pulling out wires from drums wound inside. 

It is often claimed as the world’s first guided missile.

Notepad (1902)

Notepad (1902)

Tasmanian J.A. Birchall was the first person to bind loose sheets of paper together and sold them as the first notepad. 

Birchall’s innovation involved cutting sheets in half, backing them with cardboard and gluing them together at the top.

Feature Film (1906)

Feature Film (1906)

Heralded as the world’s first full-length feature film, ‘The Story of the Kelly Gang’ traces the life of bushranger Ned Kelly. 

Written and directed by Charles Tait, the film ran for more than an hour, which was the longest time that a film had run during this era.

The movie premiered in Melbourne on December 26, 1906.

The Box Kite (1893)

The Box Kite (1893)

The box kite was developed by Irish-born Australian Lawrence Hargrave in 1893, which aided greatly in the development of powered-flight. 

On November 12, 1894, Hargrave was able to lift himself 16 feet off the ground after tying four box kites together. 

Hargrave was given a place in Australia history after he was engraved on the 20-dollar note from 1966 to 1994.

When one thinks of Australia, one turns to our national spread. 

Made from yeast extract, Vegemite has been causing rosy cheeks since 1922. 

In 1928, Vegemite changed its name to Parwill to compete with Marmite. The slogan went: “If Ma mite then Pa will”. It changed the name back to Vegemite in 1935. 

It was the first product to be scanned at checkout in 1984.

When one thinks of Australia, one turns to our national spread.   Made from yeast extract, Vegemite has been causing rosy cheeks since 1922.   In 1928, Vegemite changed its name to Parwill to compete with Marmite. The slogan went: "If Ma mite then Pa will". It changed the name back to Vegemite in 1935.   It was the first product to be scanned at checkout in 1984.

The Electronic Pacemaker was developed by Dr Mark Lidwill and Edgar H Booth in 1926. 

The original device plugged into a ‘lightning point’ and an insulated needled was plunged into the heart. 

The device was used in 1928 to revive a stillborn baby in Sydney. 

The pacemaker was used a launching pad for insertable and modern pacemakers.

Speedo swim brief (1929)

Speedo swim brief (1929)

The Speedo swim brief (also known as the budgie smuggler, banana hammock and togs) made its debut in 1929 and is still covering the privates of male beachgoers to this day. 

It is also the swimwear of choice of Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott (pictured).

Clapperboard (1930)

Clapperboard (1930)

The clapperboard was invented by F. W. Thring in Melbourne, Australia. 

The original design of the clapper involved two sticks hinged together.

Surf-life saving reels (1906)

Lester Ormsby is credited as the inventor of the surf life-saving reel which was demonstrated at Bondi Beach on December 23, 1906.

The Ute (1934)

The Ute (1934)

The Coupé utility vehicle – commonly known the ‘The Ute’ was designed by Lewis Brandt of the Ford Motor Company in Geelong. 

The idea for the Ute came from a farmer’s wife who wanted a vehicle that could take her ‘to take her ‘to church on Sundays and pigs to market on Mondays’.

The first Ute rolled off the production line in 1934.

Zinc Cream (1940)

Nothing screams Aussie more than zinc cream plastered across your nose. 

The sunscreen, which contains zinc oxide, was developed by Fauldings pharmaceutical company in 1940.

Hills Hoist (1945)

Hills Hoist (1945)

Manufactured in Adelaide by Lance Hill in 1945, the Hill Hoist is a common sight in most Australian backyards. 

The idea for the original design arose from Hill’s wife wanting an inexpensive replacement to line she had been using to dry her clothes.

The hoist can also be used to as rotating monkey bars and can be used to play ‘Goon of Fortune’.

Stainless steel braces (1956)

Stainless steel braces (1956)

Western Australian orthodontist Percy Begg started devising a new technique for repositioning teeth in the 1940s. 

When his use of stainless steel was introduced in 1956, he became an international sensation as the use of lightwire eliminated the need for head gear.

Black box flight recorder (1958)

Black box flight recorder (1958)

The ‘black box’ flight recorder was invented by Dr David Warren in Melbourne.

It was used to capture a plane’s readings and to record crew members’ conversations to determine what issues a plane ran into in the event of a crash.

Ultrasound (1961)

The work of Australian Department of Health researchers David Robinson and George Kossoff has been credited with the development of the first ultrasound in 1961. 

The first images of an unborn child were seen in 1962 at the Royal Hospital for Women.

Boxed wine (1965)

Boxed wine (1965)

The epitome of Australian classiness, boxed wine, also known as goon, was invented by Thomas Angove in 1965.

While it was less expensive and more environmentally friendly than it’s bottled-cousin, boxed wine has been criticised for its cheapness and a means for alcoholics to get drunk on a budget. 

In certain circumstances, the goon bag can also be used as a temporary substitute to a pillow.

Sarich Orbital engine (1972)

Sarich Orbital engine (1972)

The Sarich Orbital engine is an internal combustion engine that had no high-speed contact with engine walls. 

The engine never made it into production as it was prone to overheating, however the processes developed for the engine can be seen in other orbital engines. 

It was created by Ralph Sarich in 1972.

Tim Tam (1964)

Tim Tam (1964)

Created by Ian Norris, the Tim Tam was first introduced on February 16, 1964.

The name for chocolate biscuit was the work of Ross Arnott, who decided the name of the 1958 Kentucky Derby winner would be a good name for a biscuit line.

Cochlear implant (1978)

Cochlear implant (1978)

Dr Graeme Clark helped research and developed a means for deaf individuals to hear after the invention of the Cochlear implant, also known as the bionic ear. 

The first bionic ear recipient was Rod Saunders who lost his hearing at the age of 46. 

In 2008, Clark announced that he was developing a “hi fi” implant that would help users perceive music and different voices in noisy rooms.

Dual flush toilet (1980)

Dual flush toilet (1980)

Bruce Thompson can be thanked for combining two of Australians favourite things – using the dunny and saving money. 

The invention of the dual flush toilet system has been estimated to save households 320,000 litres of water every year.

IVF Embryo freezing (1983)

IVF Embryo freezing (1983)

Researchers from Monash University and the Royal Women’s Hospital in Melbourne perfected the ‘freeze-thaw’ in-vitro fertilisation technique in 1983, which allowed the freezing of an embryo, thawing it and implant it.

The first frozen embryo baby was born in Melbourne on March 28, 1984.

Polymer banknote (1988)

The Polymer bankote was developed as a joint venture between the Reserve Bank of Australia, CSIRO and the University of Melbourne as a means of preventing forgery.

Australia fully switched over from paper currency in 1996.

Multi-focal contact lens (1992)

Multi-focal contact lens (1992)

The multi-focal contact lens was invented by Queensland optical scientist Stephen Newman. 

This particular type of contact lens work in the same way at bifocal glasses, which helps people focus on multiple distances through the same lens.

Spray-on skin (1992)

Spray-on skin (1992)

Spray-on skin was developed by Dr Fiona Wood as a means of treating burns victims.

The technique shortened the time to produce skin cells to cover a burn from 10 days to five. 

Dr Wood was named Australian of the Year in 2005.

Wi-Fi (1992)

Wi-Fi (1992)

Wi-Fi’s origins can be attributed to the work of CSIRO scientist John O’Sullivan (pictured) which was the by-product of a failed experiment. 

The findings were then patented and used as Wi-Fi method to ‘unsmear’ signals. 

The CSIRO has since won numerous patent-infringement lawsuits.

Scramjet (2002)

Scramjet (2002)

University of Queensland’s HyShot team sent a scramjet into the atmosphere on a test flight, which was a world first. 

A scramjet operates at speeds five times the speed of sound.

Cervical Cancer vaccine (2006)

Cervical Cancer vaccine (2006)

Developed by Professor Ian Frazer, the cervical cancer vaccine was developed to prevention strains of HPV, which was causes a significant number of cervical cancers.

Professor Frazer’s research led to the vaccine to be distributed widely in 2006. He began working on the vaccine in 1991.

 

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